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Should I Discontinue Birth Control Before TT?

Should I stop taking my birth control that I use as a hrt before getting my tummy tuck? I'm 51 yr's old

Doctor Answers (7)

Stop BCP 2 weeks prior to elective abdominoplasty

+1

Blood clots, DVT and PE are the feared complication of an abdominoplasty.  The reported risk is quite low when compared with the general surgical, orthopedic and neurosurgical patient population.  Since an abdominoplasty is a totally elective procedure we want our patients to be in the best physical shape to minimize the risk of all complications.  It is well known the HRT increased the risk of blood clots, DVT and PE.  You should stop taking these medications for 2 weeks prior to surgery to reduce your risks.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Tummy Tucks and Estrogen are not a good combination

+1

I have my patients stop any estrogen-containing meds 2 weeks before tummy tucks and they can resume 2 weeks later.  The combination of a longer surgery, estrogen, and less mobility is a recipe for a blood clot in your veins that can travel to dangerous places.  It is very important to use the compression stockings and ambulate after surgery frequently.  Your surgeon may even want to give you a blood thinner after surgery.

Best wishes!

Holly Casey Wall, MD, FACS
Shreveport Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Should I Discontinue Birth Control Before TT

+1

If you can you will decrease your risk of blood clots which can cause deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolus (blood clots breaking off and travelling to the lungs).

Discuss with your surgeon and your prescribing doctor regarding the proper balance of risks and benefits. If you stay on them, your plastic surgeon may want to ramp up the anti clotting measures which can be taken.

Thanks and best wishes.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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No need to stop the HRT.

+1

There is no need to stop the HRT or many other medications prior to an abdominoplasty.  At the very least I would consult with your plastic surgeon an your primary care physician or whomever prescribes the medicine so that both can be made well aware of concerns

Robert Kratschmer, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Birth control pills and tummy tuck

+1

There is no simple answer, as pregnancy right after surgery or generally has risk, though so too do oral contraceptives, especially in smokers. Oral contraceptives are a risk factor for DVT and pulmonary embolism. The risk is small, though we have reviewed a case with a very bad outcome after tummy tuck. This question should be discussed with your OB or primary, and the possibilty of a clot understood to help you make the decision to stop or not before your tummy tuck.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Oral contraception and plastic surgery

+1

Oral contraception based on oestrogen tablets (the most common type, as opposed to the "mini-pill" which is progesterone) can increase the risk of blood clots somewhat. Therefore, if you are able to use other forms of contraception for the month before and the month after surgery, you will further minimise the risk of this complication. 

 

Marc Pacifico, MD, FRCS(Plast)
London Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Birth control and Tummy Tuck

+1

 I see no reason to discontinue birth control prior to your surgery.  Prior to your surgery, you will have lab test, and discuss your medical history with the Anesthesia Dept. of your hospital or outpatient center, and your surgeon.  Consult with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, certified by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) to discuss all your concerns and expectations.  Follow your  Surgeon's post operative instructions and you should go great!

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.