Ask a doctor

Seroma? Pain and Swelling? (photo)

Had a breast augmentation just over 4weeks ago and I'm experiencing very bad pain and swelling in and around my left breast around the uper pole and from the chest bone down and to the nipple it's extremly painfull to touch I can't sleep because if I lie down the swelling increases. hope the picture helps. 520cc silicon nagor implants surgeon used splitting muscle technique if this helps. Surgeon sent me away saying it would just go away and it's nothing to worry about.1ST pic wk 1/ 2nd pic wk 4

Doctor Answers (7)

One side pain and swelling after breast augmentation could be hematoma or seroma-see your surgeon

+1

Thank you for your question. The swelling and pain on one side is alarming. See your surgeon to check for hematoma or seroma.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Pain and swelling after surgery

+1

One month after BA, most but not all the swelling should be improving. Pain can continue if large implants were used in a muscular chest. Your photo shows the left side to be much larger than the right side. If your breast were of the same size before surgery and same size implants were used then most likely there is fluid collection, either blood or seroma. I would discuss this further with your PS or seek second opinion. Ultra sound can easily diagnose fluid collection but may not be covered by your insurance.

Shahriar Mabourakh, MD, FACS
Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Seroma?

+1

Pain on one side after augmentation is not that unusual, but should have resolved or be clearing up by now. If you were symmetric before surgery and the same size implants placed on each side, I am concerned there is fluid around your implant. Since there does not appear to be bruising, I would suspect seroma. In my practice you would be seen frequently--at least weekly--and I would consider exploration of the pocket. Your PS is in the best position to guide you. If you do not feel you are getting the attention you expect seek a second opinion. Good luck.

Andrew Stewart, MD
Charleston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

You might also like...

Pain in one breast

+1

Sometimes the breasts heal a bit differnently. Swelling in one breast may signify a hematoma, seroma, or infection. It is best to be evaluated in person.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Pain and Swelling 1 month after Breast Augmentation

+1

It does appear that your left breast is larger than your right. Both breasts generally heal at the same rate after breast augmentation. And, at 4 weeks you should not have significantly more pain on one side versus the other. Swelling and pain can be due to a number of different factors, especially 1 month after surgery. These include infection, seroma, or hematoma.

If you are not experiencing any redness around the breast, or fevers or chills, it is less likely to be an infection. An evaluation of your swelling with an ultrasound could make the diagnosis of a seroma or hematoma. A good clinical exam could certainly make a diagnosis, as well.

Thank you for your question and photos. Best of Luck!

 

Gregory C. Park, M.D.

Gregory Park, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Hello

+1

 

 

4 weeks post-surgery is very normal to still have discomfort. It takes 6-9 months for all the swelling to subside. If your incision is completely heal you can help by messaging your breast gently with lotion to help the nerves and break down scar tissue.

 

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Seroma? Pain and Swelling?

+1

Based upon your written description and poorly posted photo I have to think hematoma issue. Recommend a scan or second opinion in person. You may need drainage operation. Sorry

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.