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I Have Big Breasts, Can I Get Them Reduced?

How much do they usually charge to reduce your breast? my regular size is a 32D but it's hard to find bras that can fit me and they don't go with my body. I would like to reduce my breast to a 32C to look better.

Doctor Answers (13)

Breast Reduction Candidate?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Based on your description you may be a good candidate for breast reduction surgery; it tends to be one of the most patient pleasing operations we  perform.

You should educate yourself regarding the potential risks associated with the procedure. Some of the risks/potential complications associated with breast reduction surgery include:  infection, bleeding, seroma, hematoma, wound healing problems, abnormal scarring ( hypertrophic or keloid),  loss of sensation, inability to breast-feed, breast asymmetry, necrosis of tissue or skin,  unsatisfactory cosmetic results, unpredictability of exact cup size postoperatively,  recurrence of the breast hypertrophy, and the potential for further surgery.  other risks  related to surgery in general include deep venous thrombosis (clots),  pulmonary embolism, pneumonia  and even death.

Fortunately, the majority of patients who undergo this procedure by well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons and board certified anesthesiologists do very well and complications tend  to be relatively minor and treatable. The severe complications are rare.

I hope this helps.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 710 reviews

Reduction from a D to C cup is easy.

+1

Breast reduction of the variety you are inquiring about is simple and safe surgery.  The only problem are the resulting scars.  Fortunately, over time, they tend to become very acceptable.  Complications are rare and the convalescence is easy.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Large breasts after a breast reduction.

+1

 

The final size after he breast reduction surgery depends on the surgical technique that was used and your personal goals. It is possible to have breast that you consider to be excessively large after a breast reduction. If your breast remained too large and continue to produce symptoms such as back breast or shoulder pain, a revision breast reduction surgery may be in order. Consult with a board-certified plastic surgeon who is very experienced in revising breast reductions. It is important that the plastic surgeon understand the technique that was used for the initial breast reduction so that he may ensure that all your tissue heals without complications.

Pat Pazmino, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

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Breast reduction

+1

The fee for a breast reduction really varies around the country. You are best to find a really good surgeon who does nice work and then worry about the cost.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Yes, reduction is a common procedure, and very helpful

+1

Coneja:

The American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS at surgery.org) annual statistics report 140,000 breast reduction operations were done for women in the US in 2008. This is second to augmentation and more common than mastopexy (breast lift).

Breast reduction patients are among the happiest patients in a typical plastic surgery practice. Insurance tends to cover larger reductions when patients have back, neck and shoulder pain. Patients themselves pay for reductions that basically improve body proportions and appearance.

Seek an experienced board-certified plastic surgeon by networking with friends, primary care doctors and your county medical society referral service.

Sutton Graham II, MD
Greenville Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

You can certainly have a reduction

+1

A breast reduction sounds perfectly reasonable in your case. The cost varies, and in many cases, it is covered by your insurance. Each insurance policy has different criteria for what they will and won't cover, so you'll need to check with them.

There are several different ways to perform a breast reduction, so you want to be sure and ask your surgeon what type of reduction they perform and to see before and after photos.

Good luck!

Dr. Salemy

Shahram Salemy, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Cost of Breast Reduction

+1

Thank you for your inquiry. Yes it is good to start preparing for your surgery.

An office visit/consultation is mandatory prior to scheduling the procedure. The following information is based on a breast reduction procedure only. During the consultation we may determine that other procedures are better suited for your optimal outcome.

The proper breast procedure for you is a complex decision process determined based on your desires, anatomy, practicality, availability, picture review, weight loss, changes during pregnancy & nursing, etc.

Small breast reductions can be achieved with liposuction; other times it may require actual incisions limited to around the nipple and for even larger breast reductions the incisions will extend down from the nipple and under the breast.

Lifting and reduction in the size of the nipple/gland is also performed. This is usually determined at the time of the initial consultation but may need to be adjusted intra-operatively. (Only rarely and for extremely large breast reductions) is the nipple detached.

Although females generally mature at 16 years of age, the breasts can continue to increase in size following surgery in response to weight change, hormonal changes, birth control pills, pregnancy, etc.

Surgery is about 2-4 hours and is usually performed on an outpatient or overnight basis.

The choice of incisions vary tremendously and depend on the extent of the drooping (called ptosis)and the size of the breast. Incisions amy be limited to around the areola, may extend straight down from the nipple, and may require and incision under the breast as well. Scarring is unpredictable and varies according to the individual.

There are risks to crossing the street or flying in an airplane and, of course, there are risks to any surgical procedure. These risks can occur regardless of surgeon or technique. These include but are not limited to: infection, hematoma, discomfort, wound breakdown, hypertrophic scar formation, asymmetry, unfavorable healing, interference with mammography or surgical evaluation of breast masses, interference with nipple sensation with nursing and aging, discoloration of the nipple/areola, need for secondary surgical revisions, and inabiltity to guarantee a specific cosmetic result. Nipple sensation is usually diminished in large breasted individuals and can increase, decrease, or remain unchanged following surgery.

We generally recommend that you take a week off work and avoid strenuous physical activity for three weeks. Drains may be necessary. Certain dressings may be required during this time. You will be instructed in breast implant exercises.

The surgery can be done in several different places (hospital or surgicenter) and the prices vary accordingly with the last being the most affordable. An overnight stay may be required.

Although I understand your desire to obtain the price; I can't give you a fixed price for several reasons. Prices depend on:

  • Possibility of insurance coverage
  • Extent of the procedure
  • Do you want it performed in a surgicenter or in a hospital setting?
  • Do you want a nurse, a surgeon, or a Board Certified Anesthesiologist to perform anesthesia?
  • Overnight stay may be required
  • Do you want me to provide you with dressings & garments or do you want to buy them?

Depending on these factors Breast reduction can range anywhere from $4000 up to $13,000. Our fees tend to average about $8,500 to $10,000 plus OR/Anesthsia/Pain Pump/Possible overnight stay ($3,000-6,500). Think about it, and make the right choice. Many other options are available and prices do vary accordingly.

It is good to start preparing for your surgery as soon as possible. If you plan on having insurance pay for your surgery, many practices will charge you for the initial consultation. This is charged due to the amount of paperwork required in order to submit to your insurance company.

Insurance may pay nothing or up to a substantial portion of the submitted bills (consultation, surgery, hospital, anesthesia, and laboratory fees). A letter of predetermination of benefit coverage can be submitted to your insurance company after your initial consultation.

Financing is available through a variety of third party agencies. Your rate depends upon your credit rating.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

You Can!

+1

You certainly can have a reduction. The payment options depends on how much weight will be removed from each breast to acheive the size range you are desiring. Your insurance carrier has certain critieria they use to determine if they will "pay" for the procedure. If you do not meet them, you certainly can pay for it yourself. Surgeons vary in the fees they charge as do hospitals, surgery centers, etc. You certainly "shop around" for reasonable fees, but make sure the surgeon you choose meets the criteria for a good one!

Michael S. Beckenstein, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Breast Reduction costs $15,000 to $20,000

+1

Fees vary depending on the level of expertise of the surgeon and the most important part of getting a good result from plastic surgery, is the surgeon you choose.

There are several fees pertaining to any operation. For a breast reduction, which typically can take 2 and 1/2 to 3 hours, the approximate fee for anesthesia would be $1,500, the operating room fee would be $1,900 and the surgeon's fee would be in the range of $12,000 to $16,000 depending on the difficulty of your case. These fees include the follow up care and subsequent appointments.

Darrick E. Antell, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

You can certainly have a reduction

+1

What you are describing is very possible. The costs vary with your location and vary with each doctor. To go from a D to a C is generally not enough weight for most insurances to want to cover this as "medically necessary" as they usually want at least 500 grams (a pound) of tissue taken from each side.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.