Best Time for Breast Augmentation Revision?

Prior to my Breast augmentation and periareolar Mastopexy in 2002. I had A cup tubular breast deformity. I am now interested in a revision with silicone "gummy bear" implants.

Since my original augmentation, I have had 2 children with minimal change to my breasts. Would it be beneficial to wait for the revision until after done having children(2-4 more years) and closer to the 10 year mark to prevent having multiple revisions through my lifespan? What is average on revisions ( every how many years)?

Doctor Answers (10)

Breast augmentation revisions

+2

You raise some very good points, and it all depends on what you want. If you would like the new implants, now is as good a time as any. The lifespan of implants varies, but the rupture rate of them is about 1%/year which is cumulative and the capsular contracture rate is about 13% over a lifetime. I've seen implants in for 20-30 years, so if you're doing well you may not have to revise your implants at all! However, the average is about 1-2 revisions in your lifetime. Good luck!


Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Why do you want a revision?

+2

So far, you have not told me why you either need or want a revision. Are you having a problem? Also, gummy bear implants are only available for breast reconstruction, not elective augmentation. Also, they are a lot firmer. The best implants out there in my opinion are round smooth silicone.

Only do surgery when you need it .

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

If its tolerable to you, wait before Breast Augmentation

+2

If you situation is tolerable to you, then by all means, you should wait until you are done having children before undergoing more breast procedures. This minimizes the chances that pregnancy could have an adverse effect on your breast appearance and eliminates the changes that accompany pregnancy. By waiting until after you are done childbearing and breast feeding, your breasts will be in a stable, relatively stationary state allowing for better plan for achieving your goals and decreasing the chances that changes will occur necessitating more revisions..

As for routine revisions, in my experience, they seem to occur at 10-15 year intervals when you are trying to maintain a "best result".

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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Revision timing of breast implants: before, during or after children

+1

Clearly, the longer you can defer surgery, the less likely you will require multiple revisions in the future. IF there are no pressing needs to have surgery now, I would wait unitl comletion of childbearing and then have a procedure.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Breast augmentation revision

+1

Something must have peaked your interest in a revision. Are you unhappy with your breasts now? If you had saline implants- do they feel or look unnatural? Are your breast drooping? If you are just "interested" in alternatives or you are just minimally displeased, go on with your life, have your babies and enjoy them and then re-visit your question. Yo may have other concerns at that time and maybe newer implants or techniques may be available. It's not that you get a tune up or revision every so many years. You must have a problem you are concerned about or a complication that justifies the revision.

Theodore Katz, MD, FACS
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast Augmentatio Revisio with Gummy Bear Implants

+1

This is where the old saying fits "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Revisions should only be done to correct an unsatisfactory appearance. Changing the implants just for the sake of changing them because the 410's interest you is no reason for surgery. Wait until either you don't like the appearance of the breasts, are having pain issues or similar or implant rupture. Especially wait until after childbirth.

Christopher L. Hess, MD
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Wait until you actually need surgery

+1

If you are satisfied with the way your breasts look, I would not try to change the implants. You should at least wait until you are done having one or two more children, then decide. You are lucky that you haven't noticed much change with your first two children, but over time and after one or two more children, there will most likely be a difference.

At that time, you should carefully evaluate your situation and see if you need/want additional surgery. Don't do it now.

Sirish Maddali, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon

Wait

+1

Hi,

Thank you for your question!

If there is nothing wrong with them right now, I would not worry about revising your implants. Even though you have had minimal changes to your breasts with your first two pregnancies, it may be best to wait to avoid any possible changes that could require more surgeries. Also, with every surgery, there are risks and possible complications. Why risk that, if not absolutely necessary. It sounds like you have had good results so I see no reason so far to do anything.

Best regards,

Dr. Speron

Sam Speron, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Implant exchanges

+1

 If you are not having problems with the implants, then I would leave them alone.  In terms of cohesive gels, they are still not available for general use in the US.  If you plan to have a few more kids, then I would wait.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

If you are not havving active problems, leave them be.

+1

It sounds like you had a good result from your original surgery. The best way to minimize how many revisions you have in a lifetime is to wait until you actually have a problem (if you do) or a concern. No sense in planning to get "the latest" implants when you have a good result without problems. Any and each time you have surgery there will be additional risks and complications. My usual advice is "if it is not broken, don't fix it."

Francisco Canales, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.