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Is It Possible/beneficial to Use Botox for Neck Wrinkles?

Doctor Answers (14)

Botox can be used for the neck, but results vary

+11

Botox can be used on the neck for improvement of the vertical bands. It is not FDA approved for this indication, but it has been used successfully off-label for years. Results are usually appreciable, but not as dramatic as when Botox is used on the face, particularly the glabella and crow's feet. Many wrinkles of the neck are due to skin laxity rather than muscle activity, and these will not be improved appreciably.

Smaller injection doses are used, usually 2-3 units per injection point, with 10-20 units total for the neck.


Baton Rouge Dermatologic Surgeon

Botox in the neck

+1
Botox has beneficial effects in reducing appearance of platysma bands in the neck. This is an off label use but has been demonstrated to have efficacy. If the condition of the neck involves significant sagging or skin laxity, then neck lift would be the treatment of choice.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

BOTOX for Neck Wrinkles?

+1

BOTOX® for cosmetic purposes in the neck is considered off-label. However, injection into platysma muscle bands may reduce the prominence of these bands but the effects are only temporary and the injections need to be repeated over and over again, usually at four to six month intervals. On the other hand, BOTOX® is of no help to skin wrinkles, sagging skin and fullness due to subcutaneous fat puffiness. Aging characteristics including sagging skin, prominent platysma muscle bands, subcutaneous fat prominence and wrinkles are best handled with a face/neck lift type procedure.
 

Sigmund L. Sattenspiel, MD
Freehold Facial Plastic Surgeon

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Botox in the neck

+1

Botox works well to soften bands that are caused by the platysma muscles. Since Botox relaxes expression muscles that cause wrinkles rather than filling out the wrinkles directly, the injections will not improve neck skin wrinkles. You might consider skin care as a non-surgical treatment for wrinkles in general.

Bruce Genter, MD
Abington Plastic Surgeon
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Neck wrinkles

+1

Neck skin that looks wrinkled because of platysma bands can be softened with Botox. More permanent improvements would be accomplished with a surgical neck lift.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Botox fo neck muscles

+1

Botox does a reasonable, albeit temporary job on the vertical bands in the neck known as platysmal bands. It has very little effect on horizontal lines in the neck.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Botulinum toxin for wrinkles of the neck

+1

Botulinum toxin works best in active muscles of facial expression rather than static lines from chronic sun exposure or loss of elasticity. Therefore the muscles of the neck which animate with facial activity will see the best response to treatment. This consists primarily of the vertical neck bands ("turkey gobbler")

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Botox for neck wrinkles

+1

Botox for neck wrinkles does work but is very expensive, because you use at least 100 units to get a good result. Remember it ONLY lasts 6 months if lucky.

From MIAMI Dr. B

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Botox for the neck

+1

Botox is not indicated for skin wrinkles in the neck. It may be useful for the vertical neck bands due to platysmal bands. Some peels like a vipeel may help.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Neck cords yes, neck bands, not so much.

+1

BOTOX is effective for the vertical neck cords. However it is not so good for the horizontal band likes. The issue is the vertical neck cords benefit form local treatment. However improving the horizontal bands is usually the result of muscular contraction plus skin creasing. However, a neck lift is a surgery that is very helpful for both conditions.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.