Am I Being Too Much of a Perfectionist with my Breasts Following Surgery to Correct Asymmetry? (photo)

6 yrs ago when I was 20 I had my L breast reduced and my R breast lifted to correct asymmetry. L breast was a D and right breast was a B. I now love my R breast, and hate my L breast. Is it unrealistic to want left breast: nipple reduced, incision line lowered, breast overall tightened? Also, I dislike the difference in incision lengths and circular areola scar b/c there isn't one on the R. I want to do this all under conscious sedation but surgeon wants in-office procedures under local.

Doctor Answers (6)

I would leave ir alone.

+1

I think you have a nice result given that you had 2 cup sizes of asymmetry.  Every time you have surgery, there is a small but real risk of a complication.  I remember a saying when I was in my surgical training "the enemy good is better."


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Perfection in plastic surgery

+1

Your photos show a nice result.  Without the preop photos, it is hard to know how far you have come.  You can certainly try to make things better, but remember scars are "made" by you and may be worse than what you have now.  It always comes down to deciding how much risk you want for the value of the reward.

Mark P. Solomon, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Perfectionistic in plastic surgery

+1

All of us try to give you a "perfect" effort but cannot guarantee "perfect" results.  The more asymmetry you started with, the lower is your chance of getting it nearly perfect.  From your photos, you look very good.  An in person exam would tell whether it was worth doing more.  Please remember that rarely some bad things can happen like infection or worse scars and these can make you wonder why you messed with a good result striving for perfection.  Revisions aren't always better.  Tread carefully in these waters.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

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Am I Being Too Much of a Perfectionist with my Breasts Following Surgery to Correct Asymmetry?

+1

You can ALWAYS ask but to obtain these changes might be difficult as to the realistic expectations you desire. Best is in person evaluations and discussions. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Am I Asking For Too Much?

+1

Thank you for your pictures. The fact that you started with such a large size discrepancy would lead me to opine that you have had a very nice result. Your incisions have healed quite nicely and it does appear that you have a peri-areolar incision on the right as well. It is difficult to evaluate the nipples in these pictures but from what can be seen the nipple asymmetry appears very minor.

The asymmetry that is most prominent from your pictures is the slightly bigger size and the longer distance from the bottom of the areola to the breast fold of the left breast. This could be corrected with a revision that will reduce the volume and the areolar to fold distance of the left breast.

Overall you have had a very nice result from your original operation. It is not unusual that a "touch up" surgery is needed to get you to that final desired result. I hope this helps.

Good luck.

Pedro M. Soler, Jr., MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Perfectionist

+1

For someone who had a 2 cup size difference in the breasts, this looks like quite an excellent outcome. 

It looks to me that there are similar incisions about both areolae, and similar vertical and horizontal incisions. The areolae look about the same, but I can't quite tell about the nipples on these attached photos. 

What I do see in terms of asymmetry is that the left breast appears a bit larger and there is more lower pole visible, so a skin tightening and slight volume reduction along the fold incision might give you some improvement..  

Thank you for your question, and for the photos. Best wishes.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.