Will I Be Ok to Go Back to my Work After 2 Weeks?

I work in a hospital as a nurse's aide. I do have to lift patients up in bed quite often. I am having a BA on Dec 11 and was planning on going back to work on Dec 27. Will that be enough time for what I do at work?

Doctor Answers (9)

Work 2 1/2 weeks after Breast Aug.

+2

It would be a bit more tender to lift after a breast augmentation with implants placed under the muscle compared to on top of the muscle. Two and a half weeks after surgery you will likely still be sore, but could perform your duties, with help.

I tell patients to keep their elbows by their sides when lifting as that stabilizes the pectoralis (chest) muscles and uses the biceps (arm) muscles.

Please ask your surgeon what his/her preference is regarding this as all surgeons have different philosophies and answers. Good luck!


Fort Wayne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Will I Be Ok to Go Back to my Work After 2 Weeks?

+2

You may have some discomfort with lifting, and may need help, but it is most unlikely that you could do any damage to yourself at two weeks. Best of luck with your procedure. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

6 weeks if lifting

+1
Since you're lifting patients up, I would suggest you wait until 6 weeks after surgery before you get back to work. However, ask you surgeon for their advice.
 

Jerome Edelstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

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Okay to return to work after 2 weeks

+1

The only activities I would restrict a patient to after a breast augmentation would be not to lift greater than 20 pounds and avoid activities where the breasts bounce up and down for 6 weeks.  As long as you stay in a well fitting bra you should be fine.  YOu also can not drive a car when taking pain medications. Atlanta Plastic Surgeon, Dr. Z

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
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Back to Work at 2 Weeks

+1

In general, most patients can go back to work at 3 or 4 days.  However, anything that involves lifting more than a few pounds, should be delayed for at least 4 weeks.  Frequently, work can still be performed with restrictions, and many jobs allow for convalescence periods with limited work duties.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 230 reviews

Return to Work after Breast Augmentation?

+1

Your plastic surgeon will be your best resource when it comes to resuming activities after breast augmentation surgery.  He/she knows exactly how you are progressing and whether or not you have experience any complications.

Generally speaking, I suggest nurses who have to lift patients,  request “modified duty” if available. Otherwise, ask for as much help as is available.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 781 reviews

When to return to work?

+1

Thanks for your post. In general, 2 weeks is ample time to return to work, but you'll have to be careful with lifting and you may also be sore at times. Best wishes. Dr. Aldo.

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 136 reviews

Recovery after Breast Augmentation

+1

Two weeks should be adequate recovery after breast augmentation to return to lifting at work. This will be easier if the implant is placed over the muscle than below. Either way, you will have soreness in the operative area when you do any significant arm activity, including lifting. With sub glandular augmentation you may be able to return to activities even sooner. 

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Post op

+1

you are doing some heavy duty work and lifting. I would tell you to watch your activity foir at least three weeks or longer.

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.