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Safe to Have a Tummy Tuck 2 Months After C-Section Delivery?

I am considering having a tummy tuck done within the next week. I just had my second child by c-section two months ago. Is it safe to undergo surgery again so soon?

Doctor Answers (10)

Tummy Tuck with C-Section, 2 Months or 6 months after; WHICH is the BEST Option?

+2

Regarding: "Safe to Have a Tummy Tuck 2 Months After C-Section Delivery?
I am considering having a tummy tuck done within the next week. I just had my second child by c-section two months ago. Is it safe to undergo surgery again so soon
?"

For you to obtain a spectacular Tummy Tuck result, several factors must be aligned
- have realistic expectations of what can and what cannot be done with the operation
- you must be at a stable weight, preferably for 6 months
- you should not be obese (have a BMI under 30)
- must be smoke / nicotine free
- have supple, uninflammed abdominal wall
- must have a good operation, including a full muscle tightening and repair
- comply with your surgeon's instructions
- ideally have a post-surgical course free of serious complications

I am NOT a fan of C-sections combined with Tummy Tucks OR having Tummy Tucks BEFORE a full resolution of abdominal wall and skin swelling as is seen in only 2 months after a C-section. At 2 months, the tummy skin is still swollen and as a result, not as much can be removed as could be removed and tightened by waiting until 6 months after the C-section. As a result, the final result WILL suffer.  

Aside from the cosmetic concerns, I have two other concerns. First, the likelihood of deep vein clots may be higher in women a short period after their C-section. A blood clot (DVT) and especially a clot which detaches and goes to the lung is one of the most serious complications in Surgery. Second, you have a new baby that needs you and must bond with you. You really should consider the likelihood of complications very seriously. Pregnancy is associated with a great increase in the size and concentration of blood vessels near the pelvis. The likelihood of resulting fluid collections (seromas) and bleeding may be higher in this period. Is it REALLY worth having a substandard Tummy Tuck result, at best, and a substandard tummy tuck result WITH psychologically and financially costly potentially serious complications when your baby needs you?

 In my humble opinion, and I realize some of my colleagues will take offense to the following statement, the ONLY reason some surgeons perform these early Tummy Tucks is to avoid losing such frustrated women who are tired looking at their "After Baby" figures and feel they cannot wait the full 6 months. That is a business decision NOT a medical decision.

I don't think it is in your short or long term interest to have a Tummy Tuck at this early date. Wait a little while longer and you will be glad you did.

Dr. Peter Aldea


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Safe to Have a Tummy Tuck 2 Months After C-Section Delivery?

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Assuming patients have completed pregnancies I ask them to  achieve their long-term stable weight and be stable  physically, psychosocially, financially,emotionally... prior to any surgery (this may take 6 to 12 months after C-section).   Allow yourself time to heal after the c-section and enjoy your time with your baby.  Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 710 reviews

Safe Yes-Advisable No!

+1

Better off enjoying your new baby, giving your body a chance to recover (at least six months but preferably a year) and then having your tummy tuck...

Eric Sadeh, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

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Tummy tuck after a c-section

+1

I think that 2 months time after a c-section is way too soon to then have a tummy tuck. Your body is still going through the healing process from the c-section. I would wait at least a year until your weight has stabilized and you body has gotten back in shape before having a tummy tuck.

Steven Wallach, MD
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Tummy tuck after c-section

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I can tell you both as a plastic surgeon and a c-section, your body is still changing for up to six months after  a c-section.  For example, if you notice that when you get up in the morning your belly is relatively flat, but that after a few hours of being up and moving, your belly is sticking out further and hanging more, then you know that there is still swelling and inflammation happening in all of those tissues.  Also, your uterus will still be involuting (twisting back down to normal size and shape).  What is your hormone status? Are your periods back to normal? Are your breasts back to normal shape or are you breast feeding?  I advise my patients to let their bodies get back to prepregnancy status, about six months, then have the tummy tuck.  Use the time to get as healthy as possible nutritionally and exercise wise.Then invest the time and money in yourself to get the best possible result.  Do not think of a tummy tuck as the shortcut to losing weight/getting back in shape but as the payoff for all of your hard work.  Hope this helps and good luck!

Eleanor J. Barone, MD
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Two months may be too early for tummy tuck after C-section

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Although there are exceptions to any rule, it is my general advice to allow at least 4 months after delivery for satisfactory contraction of the skin.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
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Tummy Tuck OK 2 Months after C-section

+1

There are risks associated with tummy tucks (anesthesia, bleeding, infection, seroma, DVT, scarring, etc.) as well as other operations.  However, there should not be an increased risk 2 months following your C-section, but be aware that there may be restrictions on lifting your baby for a bit.

John Whitt, MD
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Tummy tuck following C-section

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There are plastic surgeons who perform abdominoplasty immediately following C-section.  In my opinion, this may lead to a suboptimal result.  While it may be safe to perform this procedure at 2 months following child bearing, I think it is generally more favorable to wait for at least 6 months.  As in all plastic surgery, the better shape you are in to begin with, the better you will be following surgery.  You body will continue to rebound for several months following surgery.  I would recommend waiting until your postpartum figure improvement plateaus.  Then consider surgery (only if you are finished child bearing).  Good luck!

Jason R. Hess, MD
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Tummy Tuck after C-Section

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Safe to Have a Tummy Tuck 2 Months After C-Section Delivery?
I am considering having a tummy tuck done within the next week. I just had my second child by c-section two months ago. Is it safe to undergo surgery again so soon?

There are some surgeons out there that would do a tummy tuck at the time of c-section.  I would recommend to my patients to wait until they are at or close to their pre-prenancy weight before moving forth with the tummy tuck.

Good luck.

Farbod Esmailian, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Tummy tuck after c-section

+1

Normally I suggest that a woman waits at least three to four months following C Section or delivery before having a tummy tuck. But if you have lost all the pregnancy weight that you intend to and you are feeling quite fit, there is nothing to prevent you from having surgery. If you wait a bit longer, the internal scarring can be a bit more mature, but again this does not have a significant effect. So if your weight is where you want it, and you are having no problems post C Section, then there is no direct contra-indications from proceeding with surgery.

William F. DeLuca Jr, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 109 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.