How Long Will my Left Breast Take to Be Symmetrical?

I just had my breast implants put in 11 days ago, my left breast is still more swollen than my right. My right one is forming it's shape nicely. I was a 32A pre op and got 380 extra high profiles, my breast width was very narrow and I'm quite petite... 45kg 5ft 3. I read that in smaller women the implant can take an oblong appearance, the left one has that look but my right one is looking nice and round. Will the swelling go down? Should I tighten the stabilizer?

Doctor Answers (13)

Breast Asymmetry

+1
Please wait at least 4 months after surgery. By that time, you'll see your breasts settle, with a rounding out of the bottom portion to create a more natural looking breast contour. Settling can be faster in one breast than the other, so don't be alarmed if your left takes longer than the right or vice versa. 


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Breasts should look symmetrical 11 days after breast implants.

+1

Hi.

1)  I know what most people will tell you, and of course you should do nothing for several months, because anything is possible.  But it is best to tell the truth even if it is not what you  want to hear.

2)  In our experience, if you are not happy with your breasts 10 days after surgery, you will probably not be happy later on.  Talk to your surgeon.  You may eventually need a revision, which is not such a big deal.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Significant differential swelling of the breasts should be examined.

+1

If there is truly a significant difference in volume of the breasts after breast augmentation the patient should be examined for potential hematoma. Modest asymmetries are very common and are due to differential swelling.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Breast asymmetry after augmentation

+1

It is common for people to have some asymmetry in regards to swelling and implant position early after surgery. It will take several weeks and up to 3 months for the implants to fully settle in. I would recommend you continue to follow your surgeons instructions with regards to the constrictor. Most of the early differences settle out over the first few months, assuming you are not seeing an accentuation of a natural difference in your breasts. Have patience and continue to follow up with your surgeon.

Shannon O'Brien, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

My left breast is more swollen than my right!

+1

Congratulations on your breast augmentation!  At 11 days post-op, it's a bit too early to worry about symmetry.  Your body heals at different rates so try to be patient and give it some time.  Make sure to follow your plastic surgeon's instructions and continue with your follow up visits.  ac

Angela Champion, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Asymmetry after Breast Augmenation

+1
Asymmetry after breast augmentation is caused by several issues including pre-existing breast size, laxity and nipple position differences, chest wall differences and differences in the way the implants are sitting.   It typically takes 1-4 months until the implants assume their final position. There is some variability with technique, implants and pre-existing breast conditions. You should follow your doctor's recommendations and be patient.  Best wishes.

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Symmetry after breast augmentation

+1

Hi there,

 

I think that it is too early to tell what your long terms results will be.  It is normal for your breasts to have different amounts of swelling and therefore different shapes at this stage.  This should settle down over the next few weeks and the breasts should become more similar.

 

If your symmetry doesn't seem to be improving as your swelling resolves then I suggest you let your surgeon know when you see them for your postoperative review.

Kind regards,

 

Dean

Dean Trotter, MBBS, FRACS
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Breast asymmetry after procedures

+1

You are very early in your recovery.  Let your surgeon know when you like the looks of your lower implant then you can focus your energies on trying to manipulate the higher implant downwards.  I use massage in my practice but not everyone believes in that.  Work on getting your implants to be where you want them because you have a very important role in that.  Results with augmentation are not instantaneous.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast assymetry

+1

At 11 days post surgery it is too early to say that the result yuo see now will be long term.

There was assymetry before the surgery so it is likely the surgeon has needed to perform a slightly different procedure on the left and right breast to correct the differences. This may help explain the different appearance at this stage

Discuss the concerns yuo have at follow up with the surgeon and give it some time to settel

Jeremy Hunt 

 

Jeremy Hunt, MBBS, FRACS
Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Early Breast Asymmetry

+1

Hello there 

You are very early post-surgery and it is much too soon to worry. Especially for someone as slim as you , the tissues there are very tight for most of 4 months and it will take you about that long to get to your final shape . 

Not uncommonly one side will settle in faster than the other and one side is often more swollen at first. 

So I think you have an excellent chance that things will settle and turn out fine. Keep your appointments and discuss your concerns with your surgeon , but don't expect things to happen in a day .

all the best 

Terrence Scamp

 

 

Terrence Scamp, MBBS, FRACS
Gold Coast Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.