2 months post op, I switched my 460cc saline to 700cc (l) 750 (r) silicone. Does this look like capsular contracture? (Photo)

Hi, I am almost 2 mos post. I had a breast revision on Dec. 9th, '13. I switched my 460cc saline to 700cc (l) 750 (r) silicone. Prior,I had 4 surgeries on my rt breast after a severe staph infection, including a capsularrophy to correct double bubble. My most recent surgery in Dec was over a year since capsularrophy. Does this look like capsular contracture? My rght sits higher than left and it is as if it has no volume. Thnks in advance for your help.

Doctor Answers (3)

Does this look like capsular contracture?

+2
I am sorry to hear about all the problems you have experienced after breast augmentation surgery. Breast implant encapsulation ( capsular contraction) presents as a change in feel of the breasts (more firm),  potentially a change in shape of the breasts, potential change in breast implant position on the chest wall, and sometimes is associated with pain. You will do best, to be seen by your plastic surgeon who, after physical examination will be able to provide you with an accurate diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Best wishes.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 793 reviews

Capsular contracture

+2
I think that you would need to be seen in person to be properly examined to determine if you have a capsular contracture or not.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Capsular Contracture

+2
Capsular contracture makes a breast feel alot firmer than a breast with no contracture. Because of the major increase in volume and previous infection the breast may have dissected differently or healed differently. An examination by your doctor would easily determine if you have a contracture.

Howard N. Robinson, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

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