Do you think my scar placement will be low? I do feel like I have quite a bit of skin and I have terrible diastasis. (photo)

Seems like longer torsos like myself have a higher incision or a vertical incision

Doctor Answers (8)

Do you think my scar placement will be low? I do feel like I have quite a bit of skin and I have terrible diastasis.

+2

My best advise is to return to your chosen surgeon to discuss this issuer in detail. Scar placement in your case needs to be fully understood prior to surgery so there are NO surprises.//


Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Do you think my scar placement will be low? I do feel like I have quite a bit of skin and I have terrible diastasis.

+2

The vertical incision is rarely necessary, but an exam would be a little better to determine this.

Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of tummy tuck procedures each year. Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

Scar placement for a tummy tuck

+2

Great question. Yes, your scar can be placed very low. You will get a great result and will be happy with the result! Best of luck.

Christopher J. Davidson, MD, FACS
Wellesley Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Tummy tuck scar placement

+2

When you go in for your consult, ask your plastic surgeon where she or he will place the scar. As others have suggested, bring in some underwear or a bathing suit so you can use them to discuss your concerns.

On someone with a long torso, sometimes the site where the belly button used to be will not be removed; there will be a small vertical scar low on the abdomen where this gets sewn closed. In the long run it usually heals very inconspicuously.

It is important for you to consider how you feel about your extra skin and diastasis, versus the scars that you will have afterward in order to have a tighter, flatter stomach overall.

Meghan K. McGovern, MD
Savannah Plastic Surgeon
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Low scars are important in tummy tuck

+2

Scar postion is too important to assume in tummy tuck as nothing can be more difficult than a long transverse scar that will not be coved by bathing suit or clothing. Wear the briefest brief or suit so your sugeon can properly mark out the best placement for you.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
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Scar placement for tummy tuck

+2

You look like a great candidate and should have an excellent result. The only thing you need to make sure of is the scar placement. Bring in a pair of panties or bathing suit bottom to make sure the scar will be covered.

Eric Weiss MD

Eric Weiss, MD, FACS
Orange Park Plastic Surgeon
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Do you think my scar placement will be low?

+2

A low scar is pretty much always the best option, and I see no reason that it would not be suggested for you. I do not see a reason for a vertical incision.

If the skin from the chest to the navel will not stretch down to the low incision, a short vertical closure (of the circle around the navel) might be needed. It makes little sense to me to have the entire incision made too high to avoid that vertical scar.

All the best.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Scar placement in tummy-tuck

+1

You are very astute in noticing that short-waisted indivuals require higher scars or vertical scar extensions. You certainly are one of those people. Although I can't be sure without an exam, I am afraid that your scar may not end up as low as you might prefer.

Frederick G. Weniger, MD, FACS
Hilton Head Island Plastic Surgeon
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