Asymmetry After Hematoma Following Implant Exchange? (photo)

Suffered an acute hematoma almost 2 wks after implant exchange and areola reduction on 1/17(right breast). After 2 days hematoma was surgically drained and new implant put in.Now have almost 3/4 inch lower areola in right breast than left (they were perfect before). What are my options to fix this? Am so uncomfortable even looking at myself. Is another surgery the only thing that will bring my areola back up and make them symmetrical again?

Doctor Answers (9)

Too early

+1

It is too early to think of revision surgery.  You should give it at least 6 months from the date of your surgery before thinking of revision of any type.  The type of asymmetry you have at this stage of healing will change with time.


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Assymetry to areloas post lift

+1

I would give it soem more time to heal and settle.the difference is minimal and could easily be corrected as an outpatinet in your doctors office.Massage and be patient for now.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Hematoma after surgery with asymmetry

+1

Its too early to worry. Even without a hematoma, the progress each breast makes may not be identical. Wait at least 3 to 4 months to let things settle down. There is nothing to do at this point but wait. Most likely, it will end up fine. Best of luck.

Paul Wigoda, MD
Fort Lauderdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Asymmetry after Hematoma Following Implant Exchange

+1

   The hematoma will set you back a few weeks in the healing process, but, if you had good symmetry before the hematoma, a little more time should return the breast to prior form.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
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A unilateral hematoma after breast augmentation will cause asymmetric healing.

+1

Because of the one-sided hematoma that was properly drained, healing one side versus the other will be asymmetric. There is an excellent chance that the final result will be fine. However the breasts will arrive at that final destination at different times.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
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Asymmetry After Hematoma Following Implant Exchange

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Best advice now is patience. The hematoma side is undoubtedly more inflamed and swollen, and that will change the overall appearance. But I would expect that to resolve and if these breasts looked even right after surgery, they will likely look even once this has resolved. 

All the best.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
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Asymmetry After Hematoma Following Implant Exchange?

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Allow 3 months of healing than consider a re donut or L-shaped lifting on the right breast. Best to be more patient after the complication you had. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
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Hematoma and shape of breast

+1

usually the breast that had a hematoma will be more swollen initially after revision. I would not get too upset at this point. Let things settle down.

Steven Wallach, MD
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Asymmetry after Evacuation of Hematoma ( Breasts Surgery)?

+1

Thank you for the question and picture.

 I'm sorry to hear about the complication you experienced after breast surgery. Given that you are less than one month out of the drainage of hematoma procedure, I would suggest that you continue to exercise patience since it is much too early to evaluate the end results of the procedures performed. Undoubtedly, residual swelling exists and breast implants may continue to "shift" into their final positions.

 I would suggest that you wait at least 6 monthly before evaluating the final results of the procedures performed;  hopefully you will be pleased with the results the procedure at that point.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.