Ask a doctor

Asymmetrical Nostrils Fixed Without Surgery? (photo)

I'm 17 years old and I noticed my right nostril is slightly higher than my left, and it drives me CRAZY!! It makes the right side of my face look completely different than my left, (in my opinion). I have NEVER had any plastic surgery, broken nose or done anything at all that would have damaged it to be like this. I would really like to fix this, if possible, without surgery.. I understand that its very minor but any information on how to fix this would be great! thank you so much!

Doctor Answers (12)

Normal Asymmetry

+2

When patients come into the office with questions of this type, and it is common, I pull a copy of People Magazine off the counter and ask them to pick the 5 most attractive people pictured in the magazine. Then I show them at least five different areas of asymmetry in each of these people's faces. No human has even halves and the minor differrence you have is very normal.

Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Is There A Non-Surgical Technique To Fix My Nonsymmetric Nose?

+1

Firstly, I definitely see the asymmetry you are referring to, and if it is driving you crazy, I highly recommend you get it fixed.  Secondly, I know of no non-surgical technique that will fix the asymmetry. 

Surgery, however brief, is the only answer and the right answer to correct the asymmetry of your nostrils and the emotional discomfort which this asymmetry engenders. 
 

Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 154 reviews

Best Treatment for Asymmetric Nostrils Non-Surgically

+1

Hi Mel,

The right side of your face is smaller than the left side. There is less support of your nostrils on the left.  A non-surgical treatment would be to inject filler at the base of the right nostril to help support it.  Choose your treating physician most carefully.  Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Nostril asymmetry

+1

The asymmetry that you mention is present, but very minimal. Surgical correction with the placement of a composite graft will provide the most natural and lasting result for your concern.

 

Be healthy and be well,

James M. Ridgway, MD

Web reference: https://www.larrabeecenter.com

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Fixing Asymmetry in Nostrils

+1

Hello. The asymmetry in your nostrils is very slight, but if it bothers you enough you would need surgery to correct the issue. The surgery would be small, but there is really no other way to get the lasting results that you desire.
 

Jaime Perez, MD
Rhinoplasty Specialist
Plastic Surgery Center of Tampa

Web reference: http://www.jaimeperezmd.com/photogallery/nose-jobrhinoplasty-7196

Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Rhinoplasty

+1

Facial asymmetry is quite common and almost every rhinoplasty patient I see has some pre-existing asymmetry.  Although I do see the asymmetry you are referring to, it is slight, and trying to correct it surgically is often not as easy as it sounds.  I say leave it alone. Other people probably don't even notice it unless you point it out to them.

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Non-Surgical Nose Job!!

+1

It is normal to have asymmetrical nostrils, but if you wanted to it is possible to reduce the size of one nostril either with surgery or even without surgery. Using skin fillers, such as Restylane, it is possible to adjust the skin fullness and shape of one nostril!

Web reference: http://www.beautifulself.com

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Nostrils

+1

Sometimes, we all have obsessive concerns about our personal "life's conditions."  However, Cosmetic Surgery may not always be the best solution regarding issues like minor nasal asymmetry.  Please seek a local physician and consult with them about your current problem.

San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Nostril asymmetry

+1

You are correct about your asymmetry. As others have pointed out everyone has differences from one side to the other, they are never identical. When I do rhinoplasty consultations I often use a feature of my computer imaging program called "view asymmetry". What it does is divide the face in half, mirrors the halves and then puts two right halves together and two left halves together. Patients are shocked when they see how dramatically different one side is from the other and what they would look like if both were identical. This is a unique feature of yours and while you can have it surgically changed you should think hard and perhaps have a lot of feedback from family and trusted friends before doing any surgery.

Fort Lauderdale Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

What To Do About Nostril Asymmetry?- Realize How Good You Actually Look

+1

You do have some asymmetry, but as you stated, it is minor. Subtle asymmetries are a normal part of all of us and actually add a special quality that makes each of us unique. Many years ago, each rhinoplasty surgeon had a nose that he or she considered "ideal", and in every single rhinoplasty they did they tried to get that nose to look like their ideal. The result was that all of their patients were walking around with the exact same nose, most of which did not look very good on that person's face. Over the years we have come to appreciate the unique quality that every face brings and when we do a rhinoplasty now we are trying to enhance (not change) the uniqueness of each person's appearance. In your case, the subtle asymmetry to your nostrils is a good, not bad feature, and while I am certain that you could find a surgeon somewhere who would agree to try and change it, I do think that you look better overall now than you would if you did make the change. Best of luck.

Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

You might also like...