Asymmetrical Breast Following Implant Removal

I had my implants removed about 6 weeks ago. It was a personal choice as I felt I was too big. As my breasts are starting to come back I noticed that I have one breast slightly bigger than the other. I had a lift prior to implants and my breast were the same size. Are they recovering at different speeds, or am I most likely going to have 2 different size breasts? Thanks

Doctor Answers (3)

Breast Asymmetry Six Week after Breast Implant Removal

+1

Breast asymmetry six weeks after breast implant removal is too early in the process to be a concern.

The amount of swelling in the breasts is not likely to be equal and may be the primary reason for the difference in the early healing period.

You should notice improvement over the next several months.

I suggest that you have a follow-up visit with your board certified plastic surgeon to discuss your concerns.


New York Plastic Surgeon

Breast Implant Removal

+1

Thank you for your question.

Since you are only 6 weeks post op breast implant removal, I would suggest that you allow your body time to heal.  At 6-9 months post op surgery, if you are still seeing breast asymmetry, visit with your surgeon to discuss your options.

Best Wishes!

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 759 reviews

Different sized breast after implant removal

+1

At six weeks you may still have some uneven swelling or a seroma in the larger side.  Have your Surgeon evaluate your breasts.  An aspiration may remedy the issue.  If there is no seroma than it may be that you have some asymmetry.  Asymmetry can be corrected by either reduction of the larger side or fat grafting of the smaller side.

Leif L. Rogers, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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