Can an asymmetric face be corrected? (photos)

My lower face seems crooked. I don't think it's very bad but it bothers me a good bit. I don't recall it being bothersome (or perhaps I just didn't notice) when I was heavier. When I study it, it looks like my jaw is too far to my left side and that side is fuller in the cheek as well. When I smile it isn't noticeable, though. I've had braces for my teeth. I'm still young and not sure if my face is still "settling" or whatnot. So, can a symmetric face be created by surgery or injections?

Doctor Answers (7)

A Polished, Balanced Face

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A small amount of facial asymmetry is absolutely normal and expected! For a small amount of imbalance, facial fillers are a perfect solution.

Dermafillers have become a widespread solution for making subtle adjustments in the appearance that creates better balance, harmony, and proportion to facial features and symmetry. The areas that you are concerned about, cheeks, jawline, and chin, are great areas to augment and balance using fillers such as Restylane and Radiesse. The process for injecting facial fillers is non-surgical, requires little downtime, and is entirely customizable to your circumstance and desired result.

By working with a board-certified facial cosmetic surgeon surgeon who specializes in facial injectables, your facial imbalance can be adjusted so you feel comfortable and confident in your appearance!


Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Options to improve facial asymmetry

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Facial asymmetry is normal and expected in everyone, as no one is perfectly symmetric. Based on your photograph, the asymmetry appears minimal. However, some options exist to possibly help improve symmetry. First, speak with a plastic surgeon to help determine the reason for your asymmetry, bone/muscle/fat/skin. If your lower face appears crooked and you've needed braces or dental work, then you may have skeletal or bone asymmetry which may require surgery to improve. Alternatives to surgery include facial filler injections (ex. Restylane, Juvederm, etc) to help camoflouge the asymmetry.

Best,

Dr. Chaboki

Houtan Chaboki, MD
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Can an asymmetric face be corrected

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While everyone has asymmetry to the face and body, there are things that can be done.  In your case, you could have something as simple as fillers to your cheeks to give more balance to your face!   We would use something like Perlane or Voluma to shape your face!

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Facial Fillers can help camouflage natural facial asymmetries

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Most of us have asymmetries in our cheeks and midface. Many people (myself included) have one side of the face that is flatter and broader, and one that is fuller and more narrow. The most common place to observe this asymmetry is in the area of the cheekbones. In my experience, women tend to notice it in themselves more than men, because women tend to notice as they put their blush on, that one side requires a bit more than the other to achieve the same highlighting effect.

Just as you can camouflage asymmetries in the cheeks and lips with makeup, you can also camouflage them in a more semi-permanent way with injectable facial fillers such as Perlane, Juvederm, new Juvederm Voluma, or Restylane.

The advantage of the hyaluronic acid facial fillers mentioned above is that they are easy to do, and are not permanent if you DON'T love the results. The disadvantage is that they are not permanent if you DO love the results. The hyaluronic acid fillers last about 5-6 months in the lips and 9-12 months in the cheeks (Note that the new Juvederm Voluma lasts up to 2 years in the cheeks). The more mobile an area is, the quicker the filler is absorbed. The most permanent solution (and for more dramatic asymmetries) is a custom designed implant, but your asymmetry is very subtle, and it's likely that you are the only one who really notices it.  

I would recommend consultation with an experienced injector and/or surgeon. Good luck!

Dara Liotta, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Correcting Facial Asymmetry

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Facial asymmetry is normal and every patient has some asymmetry to some extent.  So, don't drive yourself crazy analyzing yourself in the mirror.  With that said, there are some fast and easy ways to make nice changes in the face with minor procedures in the office.  Facial fillers such as VOLUMA can be injected in the areas of volume deficit, such as the mid face, to help lift the face and fill missing volume.  Other fillers, such as SCULPTRA, can help with global filling.  The best advice is to schedule a consultating with a board certified plastic surgeon to review your options.  Are more invasive and permanent solutions as well, such as cheek implants and they will be able to discuss the full range of options available to you.

Good Luck. 

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Asymmetric face.

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Your asymmetry is very mild and it's not noticeable to other people. Everyone has some asymmetry of their face and my advice to you be to leave it alone and do nothing.  

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Facial asymmetry can be corrected

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Every individual is to some degree asymmetrical, of course some more than others. No individual is perfectly symmetrical. Symmetry can usually be improved greatly with the use of fillers such as fat transfer to add volume where required. In severe asymmetric cases, more extensive surgery may be required such as surgery on the bones of the jaws, though from the photographs this would not be necessary in your case. Most likely stage fat transfer would be the best approach in my hands.

Jeffrey Hartog, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.