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Assymetrical Nostrils Post Rhinoplasty, Can This Be Fixed Non-Surgically?

When first my nose was done 7 months ago the nostrils where both the same size. after using lots of q-tip and smoke 10 or 20 times, one nostril is much biger and rounder than the other one but the bridge is still straight but when you look at me from straight in front you can see more into one nostril than the other, theres more `` black hole`` on one side. the side with the bigger nostril seems a tad more inflated. Is this permanent, temporary or imagined and can this be fixed with no surgery?

Doctor Answers (9)

Different size nostril

+1

It all depends on the duration from surgery.  Sounds like you are quite a way out from your original procedure, thus, this may need to be corrected surgically. 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Nostril assymmetry

+1

There is always some asymmetry of the nostrils. Usually there was some before the surgery as well. If it's very noticeable to you after 7 months then you might need some additional work. wait at least a year.

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Asymmetrical Nostrils 7 Months after Rhinoplasty

+1

Some asymmetry of the nostrils is normal, but if you're not satisfied improvent will probably require a revision. Discuss this with your surgeon.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Nostril asymmetry

+1

Nostrils are all asymmetric. You may not have noticed this before surgery.  If you did not have nostril rim excision work performed, then you most likely had this before the procedure.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Nostril asymmetry 7 months after Rhinoplasty

+1

  At 7 months, the nostril shape is most likely what it will be and it would require a surgical intervention, at this point to cahnge it.  Using Q-tips after Rhinoplasty is not recommended as it can move tissue and cause bleeding.  Smoke is very irritating to the nasal mucosa and can delay healing, IMHO and is also not recommended.  As always, it's best for you to discuss this issue with your Rhinoplasty surgeon.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Nostril asymmetry

+1

From what you described, it would probably require surgery to correct the asymmetric alar.  There still may be some swelling contributing to the problem and usually it is advised to wait one year for revision rhinoplasty.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Assymetrical Nostrils Post Rhinoplasty, Can This Be Fixed Non-Surgically?

+1

Nostrils, by nature are asymmetric. If you notice  a difference now it is possible that the asymmetry was there before and you did not see it. If this is a post surgical asymmetry  you will require surgery to correct.

Submitting pictures and comparing before and after pictures would help.

Michel Siegel, MD

Michel Siegel, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Alar retraction

+1

Although it is hard to tell without seeing your pictures what you are describing is possibly alar retraction and it can be corrected with grafting

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 130 reviews

Video: Nostril uneven after Rhinoplasty

+1

You can change the nostril shape through rhinoplasty. This does require a surgery. If it was 7 months ago, I would wait up to a year to see if things change. If not you could change the nostril through some minimally invasive techniques that could be done under local anesthesia.

Thanks for reading, Dr Youn
 

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.