Asian Rhinoplasty Technique for Flat Nose ?

Is it possible, in Asian rhinoplasty, to have the nostrils taken in if the root of the nose is flat or underdeveloped?

Doctor Answers (9)

Nostril narrowing

+1

I prefer narrowing the nostrils with deep internal sutures combined with a limited skin excision in order to minimize scarring. I would like to see photos to determine what you mean by "root" of the nose being underdeveloped. If you are referring to the skeletal structure beneath the nostrils, then, yes, in some extreme cases it may need to be augmented at the time of nostril narrowing. 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Asian Rhinoplasty Technique for Flat Nose ?

+1

Yes, the nostrils can be reduced as well as brought closer together using a columellar bunching technique.  The nasal tip can be made more defined and the bridge raised as well through Rhinoplasty.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Taking in nostrils during rhinoplasty

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The nostrils, or ala, can be taken in either in combination with building up the bridge or as a separate procedure.

It is quite common to address wide nostrils during Asian rhinoplasty. Depending on surgeon preference, the incisions can be made either in the crease where the nostrils join the cheek or in the nasal sill (floor of the nostril itself).

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Yes, the nostril width in Asians can be easily narrowed.

+1

Yes, the nostril width in Asians can be easily narrowed. If the bridge needs to be raised that can be done with your own tissue.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Technique for a flat nose

+1

So, a couple of things.

The base reduction, or taking the nostrils in, is a commonly performed part of an Asian rhinoplasty.  When done well it's seamless and really adds a nice subtle change.

The "root" or bridge is built up the give a nice, somewhat elongated, sleek looking nose.  This change is noticed more from the side profile.  That is done with cartilage grafts, often from the ear, or with implants.  There are multiple types of material with their own pluses and minuses.  Silicon or silastic work nicely and are soft.  If there are placed improperly they can be a little mobile.  Goretex has less mobility issues but has a slightly higher rate of infection. 

I would avoid and L-shaped  or "7" shaped implants.  The don't do that well long term.  If you want to make any changes to your nasal tip just use cartilage from your ear.

Take care

Dr. Lay

Chase Lay, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Asian rhinoplasty

+1

Commonly in patients with flat wide noses, the dorsum is augmented and the nasal base ( nostrils ) are brought in a bit. This is certainly possible.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Aisian nose

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Of course. Narrowing of the alar base is a commo9n technique and should be done with your primary rhinoplasty

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Alar base reduction in Asian Rhinoplasty Technique for Flat Nose

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The majority of Asian rhinoplasty cases require augmentation of the nasal dorsum (I think this is what you mean by "the root"). Additionally some patients desire a more balanced look which comprises tip defining maneuvers and also narrowing of the alar base (at the nostrils). Alar base reduction entails additional incisions and removal of excess tissues in order to narow the nose. This can be accomplished at the time of surgery or as an adjunct procedure in the office at a later date.

Suzanne Kim Doud Galli, MD, PhD, FACS
Washington Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Alar Base Reduction

+1

Absolutely!  In fact alar base reduction is common with Asian noses.  This can be done at the same time as your rhinoplasty or independently.

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.