Areola Reduction

I cannot find much info on an areola reduction. I am a 38DDD is an areola reduction an option at all? I imagine it is not and I am sure I need a full lift. I have a consultation for a TT and I am going to ask about my breasts as well. In a perfect world I would be a candidate for an areola reduction with implants. I do not care so much about upper pole fullness but more about nipple placement. I also would like them to be slightly larger. I am 5'10 btw.

Doctor Answers (10)

Breast Lift, Areola Reduction

+2

Greetings:  You have true breast ptosis and loss of breast volume.  You are not alone.  This is typical for a women after having children and loosing weight.  There is a solution.  Typically, I would suggest that the patient receive a breast implant and then I would tighten up the skin (lift the breast) and reduce the size of the areola and make it more round in shape.  A breast lift alone is another option to consider. 


Palm Harbor Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Areola reduction?

+1

Yes, you are a candidate for areola reduction. Fortunately, this is a procedure that can often be done under local or general anesthesia. Unfortunately, it will not give you enough of a “breast lift”, if that is your primary goal. It is important to discuss your goals carefully so that the  appropriate operation can be designed and executed.

It would be wise for you to consider the  scar that will result, around the  areola. The appearance of the scar may range from a fine line to a wide/thick/raise scar (that may require scar revision surgery).

You should also consider  other unfavorable sequelae resulting from this procedure. This may include asymmetric areola, loss or change of sensation, wound healing problems (possibly suture related), recurrence of the “spreading of the areola” and potential changing/flattening of the breasts' profiles.

Please make sure you're working with a well experienced/board-certified plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 756 reviews

Areola reduction- your options

+1

You are an excellent case for areola reduction.  An areola reduction would make your areolas smaller, rounder, and more symmetric.  Areola reduction is rarely performed alone, as most patients with very large areolas also have large or ptotic (drooping) breasts.  At minimum, you would benefit from areola reduction in combination with a mastopexy (breast lift).  You seem to have a decent amount of breast volume, but most of it is hanging low.  Repositioning some of this tissue and tightening the skin may actually give you some of the fullness that you are looking for without the need for an implant.  Good luck!

B. Aviva Preminger, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon

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Areolar reduction

+1

I think you are a great candidate for a vertical breast lift with areolar reduction.  This procedure would improve your upper pole fullness and would make your breasts look a little bigger.  The lift and the reduction in areolar diameter give the illusion and a slightly larger breast - all without the expense, risk and upkeep of an implant. 

Lisa L. Sowder, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Areolar reduction as part of breast lift

+1

Your photos do show that the nipple is below the breast fold and you would be a good candidate for a breast lift. Most breast lift procedure will reduce and balance the size of the areola as part of the procedure.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Benefit from a breast lift and areola reduction

+1

You would clearly benefit from a breast lift with/without implants. If you are indeed a DDD then with the lifting and reconfiguration of your breasts you probably will not need implants.

As part of the lift, the areolas are elevated and (usually) reduced in size. This should give you a very nice result particularly in  conjunction with a tummy tuck.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Areola reduction

+1

If you are considering a tummy tuck, then think about a breast lift (this will make your areolas smaller and more balanced). With the breast lift and new look for your abdomen, you may not need breast implants.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Areola Reduction

+1

Thanks for the photos. You need based on the breast photos a full lift with small implant. The areolae can be reduced during this operation. From MIAMI DR. Darryl J. Blinski

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Areolar Reduction is pART of most breast Lifts and Breast Reduction procedures

+1

Regarding: "Areola Reduction
I cannot find much info on an areola reduction. I am a 38DDD is an areola reduction an option at all? I imagine it is not and I am sure I need a full lift. I have a consultation for a TT and I am going to ask about my breasts as well. In a perfect world I would be a candidate for an areola reduction with implants. I do not care so much about upper pole fullness but more about nipple placement. I also would like them to be slightly larger. I am 5'10 btw
."

Areolar Reduction is performed as part of ALL breast Lift and Breast Reduction procedures. In your case, the size and shape of the areolae is secondary to the significant breast sagging. I think you would do fat better with a Short Scar (Hall-Findlay) Breast Lift than adding an implant. The lift would not only give you perky breasts with properly placed nipples but would use the sagging lower pole breast tissue to boost and serve as an auto-implant - a much better option than using implants.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Areola reduction alone is rare

+1

It is possible to do areola reduction by itself but it won't do much for you.  If you wanted implants you really need a full lift as the periareolar lift will leave you flat and baggy looking so the shape won't be pretty even though there are less scars.  If you don't want to be larger and don't care about upper pole fullness, you could do a full lift alone with no implants.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.