I am having another surgery to repair slipped implant. How can I make sure I don't have to have another?

Replacement implants done in Oct. 2013. My rt breast is soft and looks great. Org implant in left had ruptured and surgeon had lots of cleaning up to do. Now, that implant has slide to the bottom where the incision was made & has an indentation. I still have not regained total feeling back however my nipple responds but is painful when it does. Repair surgery soon, how do I insure I do my part to make sure it stays in place this time & suggested diet to eat while recovering.

Doctor Answers (9)

Internal bra to maintain implant position

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It sounds like the amount of tissue that had to be removed because of the implant rupture left the coverage and support too thin. The most reliable way to repair this and minimize the chances that additional surgery will be needed is to add support and coverage with an internal bra using Strattice, GalaFLEX mesh, or SERI Scaffold.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Simultaneous lift uses the woman’s own dermis to prevent slipping

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Unfortunately, you have not provided any photographs, your breast size or implant size. The best implants are small implants because they weigh less and undergoes less displacement. I recommend textured silicone gel implants since they feel more natural, are more adherent and less likely to displace. Your implants are too low and extend too far below the muscle. I recommend smaller implants placed high and with plication inferiorly to prevent descent. I do not recommend strattice to prevent displacement. I recommend a new technique called Implant Exchange with Mini Ultimate Breast LiftTM, which uses the patient’s own dermis, instead to prevent displacement.

Best Wishes,

Gary Horndeski, M.D.

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

How to avoid secondary and tertiary breast implant issues

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The answer is that there really isn't anything that you can to make for sure you don't have more problems. In fact, there are more problems that occur with revision surgeries than there are with first time patients. And I am not certain that there are any special diets, massage techniques, or exercises that will make much of a difference. Most of the end result will be dependent on the surgical technique that is used. Eat a normal diet with normal protein. Other than that, just follow your surgeons advice on the follow up care.

William T. Stoeckel, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

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Ruptured implant surgery

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It is always difficult to replacement implants at the time of  a ruptured implant removal.  That is because by the time you remove the implant, the capsule comes with it and the pocket is now larger than it was before.  As a result, a lot more work is required to revise the pocket and make sure the implant sits in the correct position.  The risk of complications and asymmetry is higher.  You will likely need a new pocket created on that side in order to improve your symmetry.

Samer W. Cabbabe, MD, FACS
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Preventing implant malposition

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really depends on many factors and your surgeon will have guidelines for you to follow.  My patients are asked to commit to wearing a cut out underwire bra for 6-8 weeks to keep the weight of the implant off of the internal suture line while healing is happening.  In addition, activities are limited during this time but this is different for those under the muscle versus those above the muscle.  So discuss with your surgeon and good luck!

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast

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Thank you for the question.


There's no assurance that this won't happen again, but by fixing the pocket this can be prevented. Follow all your PS's post op instructions.

Dr. Campos

Jaime Campos Leon, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 165 reviews

Implant displacement

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Implant malposition issues can occur and fixing the pocket often does the trick.  Good luck with the surgery.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Displaced breast implant

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Unfortunately there is no guarantee that a displaced implant won't displace again. In fact, it is almost guaranteed that given enough time, it will shift to some degree in that nothing is really completely permanent. Tissue will continue to weaken as you age and gravity and movement will always tend toward implant downward drift. There are so many factors such as size of implant, method of creating a new pocket (internal sutures, capsulorrhaphy, neocapsule, etc.), strength of soft tissue, location of implant, etc. In the end, you will have to trust your surgeon to make the right decisions and perform the procedure technically well. Have a frank and comprehensive discussion with your plastic surgeon

Robin T.W. Yuan, M.D.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

How to keep a slipped breast implant in place

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Revisional breast surgery can be challenging, especially when an implant has slipped to a low position.  There can be no guarantees that this problem can be prevented after another surgery, but here are some strategies that have helped my patients.  If there is good structure to your tissue, it may be possible to fix the problem with a series of sutures at the bottom of the breast that prevent the implant from settling again.  If your tissues are too weak to support the implant, the best approach I have found is to reinforce the base of the breast with acellular dermal matrix.  Although this material is expensive it has been very helpful to patients who were referred to me with problems similar to what you describe.  Best of luck!

John Q. Cook, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.