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Can Allergies Increase Your Chances of Getting Capsular Contracture?

In 2 weeks I will have breast augmentation surgery and today I woke up with a sudden allergic reaction to benzoyl peroxide that I use on my skin (facial swelling and rashes). I'm wondering if having an allergic reaction to something in weeks prior to surgery, can increase my chances of getting capsular contracture? For example, I've read on the net that having the flu weeks prior to BA surgery can increase chances of CC, Can an allergic reaction do this too?

Doctor Answers (6)

Capsular contracture

+1

I do not think allergies increase one's risk for capsular contracture. If your breast has gotten hard over time, it may be due to scar tissue that formed around the implant.  Capsular contracture is progressive.  Patients usually notice capsular contracture when the implants become hard.  It can also cause distortion of the implant as well as give pain.  You should see your plastic surgeon to see whether you would need implant exchange with capsulectomy.

Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Capsular contracture and allergic reaction

+1

I see no cause for concern given your allergic reaction to benzoyl peroxide.  Good luck with your surgery.

Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

No Connection Between Contractures and Allergies

+1

As far as all of the data and literature goes, there should not be a connection between allergies and capsular contracture, or even the flu for that matter.  Early contracture usually comes from either trauma or bleeding around the implant during or after surgery, or bacterial contamination.  You should be fine. ci hope this helps.

Barrington Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Capsular Contracture Not Associated With Allergies

+1

Your allergic reaction to topical benzoyl peroxide does not predispose you to capsular contracture.  I would however wait until your symptoms resolve before proceeding and make sure that your plastic surgeon is aware of this before your surgery day.  Good luck on your upcoming breast augmentation.

New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

No evidence to suggest increased risk of capsule contracture with allergy

+1

To my knowledge there is no evidence to suggest, let alone support, that an allergic reaction around the time of breast augmentation surgery has anything to do with capsule contracture.  For that matter, there is no evidence that I am aware of to suggest that "flu" has such a relation to capsule contracture either.  The bottom line is that we still don't know precisely what causes capsule contracture, but the prevailing theory is that, at least in most cases, it has something to do with bacteria and a thing called "biofilm" which bacteria can form on implants of any kind.  This leads to inflammatory response in the tissues but not a frank infection, and this causes the contracture.  It is true that we use an asthma medicine, Singulair, to treat capsule contracture when it happens, but this isn't because of any relation between asthma and allergies or contracture and allergies, rather it has to do with the fact that Singulair is actually a special type of anti-inflammatory medicine different from NSAIDs like Motrin, and it seems to have a good effect on capsule contracture in some cases.  My suggestion is that you get your allergic condition treated so that you will be in top form on your surgery day, but I wouldn't worry about that leading to capsule contracture.

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Can Allergies Increase Your Chances of Getting Capsular Contracture?

+1

There is no evidence to support this contention. So long as your rash has healed and there are no open weeping areas, going ahead as planned seems a good option. 

All the best. 

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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