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Is Alexandrite or YAG Laser Better for Removal of Nevus of Ota Around Temples and Eyelids?

Is Alexandrite or YAG Laser Better for Removal of Nevus of Ota Around Temples and Eyelids?

Doctor Answers (2)

Is Alexandrite or YAG Laser Better for Removal of Nevus of Ota Around Temples and Eyelids?

+1

I actually prefer the q-switched ND Yag in darker skin patients.

The alexandrite is still in the visible spectrum of light and therefore can be absorbed by the darker skin patients' melanin, thereby increasing risk of hyperpigmentation/hypopigmentation following a burn. 

Having said that, it is very important to do test spots prior to treatment in order to observe individual responses.  The patient shown below in the video is an african-american with nevus of ota who had test spots done prior to this treatment, along with other precautions that should be taken prior to this type of treatment.  Please seek board certified dermatologists with extensive experience and laser physics knowledge.

Best.

Dr. Malouf

Web reference: http://www.mytotalskincare.com

Dallas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Laser for Pigmented Birthmark

+1

Nevus of Ota is a pigmented birthmark more common in Asians.  Studies have found a good response to Q-switched alexandrite and Nd:YAG lasers and either one could be used.  Multiple treatment sessions are necessary for best response.  Nd:YAG is preferable if you are darkly pigmented because it has less melanin absorption with less risk of injury to pigmented skin.  Nd:YAG also penetrates deeper than alexandrite.  Caution is advised when using deeply penetrating lasers around the eyes. Internal eyeshields should be used if treatment is to be done close to the eye.  I have had good success treating Nevus of Ota with Q-switched lasers.  Good luck with your treatment. 

Lone Tree Dermatologic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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