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Age 13 , Round tip nose & a bit big. Whats the age a plastic surgeon will consider having me as a patient? And the cost?

I'm 13, turning 14 next month. I never liked my nose. I never smile. I never smile because my nose stretches out. And it's big. And it makes me insecure. I was just wondering what the cost would be.. And would a plastic surgeon have me as a patient considering I'm not yet 14.
Here is a link to the costs of Rhinoplasty in your area.

Doctor Answers (4)

Rhinoplasty at age 13

+2
There are several factors to consider, skeletal age, your growth rate, and emotional maturity to name some. Part of the look of adolescence is being all lips and nose until facial growth catches up and the face matures. The typical age is 15 to 16 for young women, later for young men. If you look at your classmates variation is common. With your parents help you can introduce the idea and perhaps see a surgeon in your area.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Earliest Age for Rhinoplasty

+2
Hello Sky,

This is a question that is asked a lot. I typically ask patients to wait until age 15 for girls and age 17 for boys. I feel those are typical ages where growth (facial and otherwise) is almost complete. However, as you know, there can be quite the variation physical maturity between different people. In addition, I think what is also equally important is emotional maturity. The patient has to have a strong support network (parents) and everyone has to be motivated and mature enough to have surgery. It is not ideal when a young patient wants surgery and the parents are not for it. Even worse is when some parents seem to push the idea of surgery onto a young patient who doesn't really want it. In those two cases, I won't offer surgery.

As for costs, this varies tremendously by locale and surgeon experience. I would say that most experienced rhinoplasty surgeons will charge at least $8000-10000 inclusive of the surgeon's fees, operating room fees, and anesthesia provider fees.

Hang in there and I hope you find the right surgeon for you. If it's really bothersome, there's no problem in seeking consultation knowing that you might have to wait a year or two before getting an operation. Look on the bright side: if by that time you still want it, you know that it's right decision.

Michael M. Kim, MD

Michael M. Kim, MD
Portland Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Rhinoplasty can be performed when you have finished your growth spurt, usually 15 for girls and 16 plus for boys.

+1

Rhinoplasty on teens really depends on two things. Most girls are past their growth spurt by 15 years old, sometimes earlier, boys  by 16. Whats more important is the emotional maturity of a teenager to make an adult decision to change your nose. As for cost, it can range from $8000 to $11000 in the NY area for the surgeons fee. Remember, you have one nose and want to do it once. Going to a discount surgeon may get you a discount result. Find the best doctor you can then sit down and make a plan for now or in a year or so.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

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14 y/o Rhinoplasty

+1
Whether your are 13 y/o & 11 months or 14 y/o & 2 months, it doesn't really matter as to being a candidate for a rhinoplasty. Most girls are physically mature at ~14 years of age and are usually psychologically mature enough to handle the procedure. Boys physically mature at ~16 years of age.

A standard cosmetic rhinoplasty without functional breathing surgery (septum/turbinates) runs around $4100. The price includes the board certified Plastic Surgeon, board certifeid Anesthesiologist, and AAAASF Medicare Approved Surgicenter.

Consult a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Best wishes

George C. Peck, Jr, MD
West Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.