Post-op Upper Blepharoplasty - Will I Ever Be Able to Look Up Normally Again?

I am 40 yo. I had upper and lower blepharoplasty surgery 2 weeks ago and my eyelids don't quite follow my eyes when I look all the way up. As a result when looking up I look really weird. Will I ever be able to look up normally again, after my upper eyeid blepharoplasty?

Doctor Answers (7)

This Could Be Temporary Due to Swelling

+3

Not having normal ability to look up can be normal result from swelling, and will improve with time.

Muscle injury is a consideration, but very unlikely. Ask your surgeon to evaluate you to be sure this is the case.


Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Problems looking up after eyelid surgery

+2

Most likely, this is due to post-surgical swelling. Since it has only been two weeks since your surgery, there is still a lot of healing to occur. If this problem does persist, discuss this with your surgeon.

Ryan Greene, MD, PhD
Fort Lauderdale Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Blepharoplasty at two weeks

+2

Will you be able to look up normally?  At two weeks you are probably still suffering from swelling.  Give it some time to heal and it probably will get better.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Swelling & Healing After Eyelift

+1

If swelling due to the eyelift surgery (or blepharoplasty) is what’s causing the limitation in eye movement, there should be improvement with resolution of the swelling.

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Unable to Move Upper Eye lid After Upper Blepharoplasty

+1

If you do not have double vision, most likely what you are describing is due to swelling. Be patient, and monitor the progress of your upper eyelid movement.

Michael A. Jazayeri, MD
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Swelling versus Inferior Oblique Injury

+1

It is possible that this is due to swelling in the postoperative period but it may also be due to injury to the inferior oblique muscle during lower lid blepharoplasty.  The secondary function of this muscle is actually elevation of the eye and so injury to it would result in the inability to look up.  The primary function is excylotorsion.  Patients also note double vision that is worse when looking down/ reading.  You may want to consider evaluation by an oculoplastic surgeon or ophthalmologist if this does not improve as your swelling improves.  orlandoeyeopener.

Keshini Parbhu, MD
Orlando Oculoplastic Surgeon
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Why won't my eyelids follow my eyes when I look all the way up?

+1

Regarding: "Post-op Upper Blepharoplasty - Will I Ever Be Able to Look Up Normally Again?
I am 40 yo. I had upper and lower blepharoplasty surgery 2 weeks ago and my eyelids don't quite follow my eyes when I look all the way up. As a result when looking up I look really weird. Will I ever be able to look up normally again, after my upper eyeid blepharoplasty
?"

An uncomplicated upper lid Blepharoplasty should NOT be associated with extensive swelling which interferes with movement of the upper lid as far as 2 weeks after surgery. "Weird" does not quite precisely describe two scenarios that need to be considered:
- IF the in course of the upper lid surgery the insertion of the muscle lifting the upper lid (Levator aponeurosis) was injured or cut) you could have sagging upper lids with difficulty getting them to raise.
- If in the course of the lower lid operation your surgeon injured one of lower lid eye muscles (inferior oblique) you could have a hard time looking down when going down stairs.

You need to discuss this with your surgeon.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.