What Should I Do After Having Four Unsuccessful Surgeries to Correct Ptosis?

I aquired ptosis in my left eye at the age of 35. I have had four unsuccessful surgeries. Three by the same surgeon and the fourth by a different surgeon. Are there certain people that this surgery does not work for? What other options do I have?

Doctor Answers (11)

"Unsuccessful Ptosis"

+2

There are many factors that go into the evaluation of a patient with acquired ptosis. These incluce the age of the patient, eyelid muscle [levator] function, degree of ptosis, prior surgeries, prolonged contact lens use, and the underlying etiology of the ptosis, neurogenic, myogenic, mechanical, etc.

You are relatively young to have a "run of the mill" levator dehiscence [often termed senile ptosis]. Most of my patients this young have had a long history of contact lens wear. The prolonged manipulation of the eyelid can sometimes lead to the "slipping" of the muscle insertion. Many younger patients may have a component of myogenic [congenital] ptosis that has been present since childhood. These can be more difficult to correct.

And finally and most importantly, there are certain medical conditions, such as myasthenia gravis, which may complicate matters.

I agree with the others that you need to be evaluated by an Oculoplastic surgeon, or a neuro-ophthalmologist, or both.

Good LUck


Seattle Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Correction of eyelid ptosis

+1

Given your history of having had multiple surgeries without the desired correction of eyelid ptosis, you are best advised to seek a specialist for evaluation and appropriate management.

Olivia Hutchinson, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

What Should I Do After Having Four Unsuccessful Surgeries to Correct Ptosis?

+1

Dear Glenolden,

Unfortunately, without more information it is difficult to answer your question.  The best advice for you is to see an Oculoplastic Surgeon with all of your records and operative reports, let him examine you, and then get an opinion of whether you can be helped.  If you are unsure, get a few opinions.  Good luck.

Sam Goldberger, MD
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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Success is sometimes a relative term

+1

Glenolden,

Though brief, your question speaks in volumes.  We really need to see photos(before and after) and we need to know the nature of your surgeries before commenting.  This sounds like a complex problem, but surely there is someone that can offer a solution.  Specialists with the most experience in ptosis correction are probably oculoplastic surgeons.  I would recommend consultation with one.  Get all of the photos and records that you can in order to provide the full picture.  Good luck!

Kenneth R. Francis, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Unsuccessful Ptosis Repair

+1

It may be possible that you have poor excursion of your levator muscle which is responsible for opening up your eyelids. If this is the case, then you may not be able to have a complete dynamic repair done. You might want to see an oculoplastic specialist in your area to get their opinion.

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Ptosis repair of eyelids

+1

Since you have had so many problems or failed surgeries, the best advice is to seek out a specialist in your area or travel to an comprehensive medical center which specializes in your area of concern.  Without a more detailed history of your medical issue or the procedures that you have had, it is impossible to give you more specific advice.

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Recurrent ptosis

+1

If you are having problems with ptosis and have had four different surgeries, then I suggest you get all your medical records of your surgeries and photos, and seek a specialist.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

What Should I Do After Having Four Unsuccessful Surgeries to Correct Ptosis?

+1

Sorry for all these issues. Go find a University specialist to examine you. From MIAMI Dr. Darryl J. Blinski

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

What Should I Do After Having Four Unsuccessful Surgeries to Correct Ptosis?

+1

without reviewing your pre and post op photos it is impossible to comment on what  can be done to correct this problem

Robert D. Goldstein, MD
Bronx Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Obvously, you need to find a surgeon in whom you can place your trust.

+1

Dear Glenholden

Much depends on the nature of your ptosis.  If you have good excursion of your upper eyelid, then it is much more likely that surgery will be successful.  If you have poor movement of the upper eyelid, then it is much less likely that surgery will be successful.  However, this should not be a surprise.  Levator function should be carefully measured before surgery and a discussion of the  likelihood of successful surgical outcome or the lack thereof should have been part of your consultation prior to each and every surgery.  It is important that you see an experienced oculoplastic surgeon for this type of work.  General plastic and facial plastic surgeons do fine cosmetic eyelid surgeon but generally lack the depth of training to deal with complex ptosis surgery.  As you live in the suburbs of Philadelphia, finding a highly qualified oculoplastic surgeon should not be a problem.  The American Society for Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery maintains a website (ASOPRS.org) that has a geographic directory to assist you in finding a highly qualified surgeon near were you live.  Consider getting several opinions before proceeding.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.