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How Soon After a Tummy Tuck Can I Go on Theme Park Rides?

I'm currently 4 weeks post-op and won a trip to Disneyland & California Adventure 2 weeks from now. So at 6 weeks is it safe to get on the rides? Or should I avoid harsh rides (Splash Mountain, Tower of Terror, etc)? I mentioned it to my surgeon and he said it should be fine, but I'm planning on talking about it with him in more detail during my next appt. I just want to get advice/opinions from other surgeons, as someone may have experience with this type of thing.

Doctor Answers (5)

Tummy Tuck-- Restrictions after surgery

+2

We instruct our patients to avoid heavy activities for about 6-8 weeks.

The reasoning is that by then some amount of healing has happened between the reconstructed abdominal muscle. Also you want to make sure the soft tissues have healed at least partially to the covering of the muscle. Lastly, your inicisions has to be healed before doing extreme activities.

You should avoid heavy lifting and it would be best to gradually increase your activities.

Please consult your plastic surgeon for more individualized answer given that he know what kind of techniques he used during your procedure.

Hopefully this was helpful.

Dr. Sajjadian


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 120 reviews

Tummy Tuck - How Soon After a Tummy Tuck Can I Go on Theme Park Rides?

+1

Yikes - how soon do you want to?  I generally advise my patients that there is no exercise for 3 weeks post-op, and after that you can start slowly and advance as tolerated.  A semi-violent theme park ride at 4 weeks does not count as advancing slowly as tolerated.  I would say you should skip those rides for now.  At 6 weeks you can do full exercises - and if you feel okay, then the jerky, pulling motions of a ride will probably be okay.  But before then, I would probably advise against...you don't want to be mid-ride and have a sudden jerk, pull, twist, turn...pain...etc.

I hope that this helps, and good luck,

Dr. E

 

Alan M. Engler, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 150 reviews

Roller coaster and amusement park rides after tummy tuck

+1

Six weeks should generally be safe but having said that, common sense is king! As you have suggested, I would avoid the particulary "violent" rides in favor of the normal roller coasters. I think I personally would not feel comfortable until 3 months.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Going on "Active" Park Rides after a Tummy Tuck

+1

Regarding ; " How soon after a tummy tuck can I go on theme park rides?  I'm currently 4 weeks post-op and won a trip to Disneyland & California Adventure 2 weeks from now. So at 6 weeks is it safe to get on the rides? Or should I avoid harsh rides (Splash Mountain, Tower of Terror, etc)? I mentioned it to my surgeon and he said it should be fine, but I'm planning on talking about it with him in more detail during my next appt. I just want to get advice/opinions from other surgeons, as someone may have experience with this type of thing."

The underlying question is has enough time passed to allow sufficient healing to brace the muscle repair and attachment of the skin to the tightened muscles and would crazy park rides risk wound disruption?  By 6-8 weeks there should be more than enough healing to allow you to resume mild exercising and some weight lifting. Even going on those crazy rides if you enjoy that sort of thing.

Good Luck. Don't forget to put on the scopolamine patches take barf bags along...

Dr. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Tummy Tuck

+1

Generally speaking by 6 weeks you can start more strenous activities as long as your incisions are completely healed and sealed.  However, I would consider avoiding the very extreme rides.  Ultimately, your plastic surgeon is the best judge of this. 

Siamak Agha, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.