After Periareolar Surgery I Have 2 Creases Underneath my Left Breast

I had my surgery done on Jan 21,2011 saline 425 cc left 450 cc right.My right breast seems almost perfect,although it was the one with most scabbing around nipple.The left one has double creasing underneath, one seems to be the natural crease which goes all the way around, the othr goes 3/4 way around. The inside of the left one is a little harder and I hv more discomfort etc in the left.PS told me to wear band as they had not dropped yet, however, the right one seems perfect. Please advise!

Doctor Answers (6)

Two creases under the breast after surgery

+1

Having two creases after breast augmentation is commonly referred to as Double Bubble deformity. This usually happens when a small breast is made considerably bigger which requires the natural fold to be released. The fold is released to allow shaping of the pocket for the implant. When the fold is released the original fold under the breast can sometimes still be visible. That is what creates the upper fold. Of course, a new fold is formed with the new pocket. That would be the lower fold. The risk of Double Bubble deformity is a little higher with a woman that starts with a small and firm breast. 

There are some things that can be done to improve the appearance of Double Bubble. In some cases a revision of the pocket can improve things. In other cases a little fat grafting can make the deformity better. I would recommend that you wait at least 6 months before your consider any revisions.

I hope this info helps!


Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Double Bubble Deformity

+1

Based on your description, it sounds as if you have a double bubble deformity.   This occurs when the natural crease between the breast and chest wall (inframammary fold) is lowered too much and the implant falls below this natural crease.  It will require revision surgery to correct.   I would recommend close followup with you plastic surgeon to diagnose your problem and discuss your treatment options.

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Double crease after breast surgery

+1

It is very difficult to know what you are experiencing and to give advise without a photo, sorry!

Amy T. Bandy, DO, FACS
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

You might also like...

Evaluation necessary.

+1

Sounds by your description, although there are no pictures to view that you possibly are getting a double bubble which can be repaired.  A personal evaluation is necessary to advise you for sure.  You are still in the healing process so you should listen to your surgeon and follow all the post op instructions at this time.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Double Bubble

+1

A double bubble is probably developing as a result. This should be fixed but I would have to evaluate it in person.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Do I Have a Double Bubble?

+1

First of all, at one month out from surgery you are still in the early phases of healing. That being said, it is very hard to advise without a preoperative and current photograph. From your description this could be a double bubble with capsular contracture. A double bubble occurs when the implant is below the natural crease. Sometimes this occurs when the patient has a very high and tight crease preoperatively and the crease has to be lowered to match the other side. If that is the case then as the skin stretches the original crease fades. However, a true double bubble occurs when the natural crease has been disturbed and the implant falls too low. These cases need revision surgery to correct. Again, without preoperative and current photos it is difficult to advise any more specifically.

Hope that helps and good luck!

Dr. Babak Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.