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I Had Abdominoplasty to Repair Diastasis Recti and Hernia, Why is My Naval Still Herniated? (photo)

I had abdominoplasty to repair severe diastasis recti and umbilical hernia after a twin pregnancy. My doctor and I both noticed that I had a minor umbilical hernia again about 4 weeks after the surgery. He felt that it would improve. Now, nearly a year after the surgery, it has gotten a little worse. He noted it at my last check-up a few weeks ago and I declined to have any further repair. I am now reconsidering. It is mildly painful. I worry the tear is spreading to my abdominal muscles.

Doctor Answers (7)

Umbilical hernia prominent after tummy tuck

+1

An umbilical hernia is very common. With the tightening of the abdominal wall musculature including the rectus muscle repair, this hernia and the associated symptomatology can be precipitated or exacerbated. Given your symptoms and the potential issues that can occur such as bowel strangulation, repair of this hernia may be reasonable. It should not disrupt or undo the tummy tuck repair. 


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Umbilical Hernia and Abdominoplasty

+1

It is not uncommon for patients to have an umbilical hernia that is noted prior to abdominoplasty.  Repair is performed simultaneously but separately from the repair of diastasis recti to alow complete hernia reduction and repair.  Caution needs to be considered as significant undermining of the umbilical stalk at the time of abdominoplasty can risk the blood supply to the umbilicus with the possibility of the umbilical skin having partial or complete death (necrosis).  The same considerations should be addressed with a delayed umbilical hernia repair after abdominoplasty.  In most cases, the belly button has been moved (transposed) and the blood supply is dependent on the stalk of the umbilicus.  Subsequent hernia repair needs to again take this into account, perhaps giving consideration to laparoscopic approaches.  Make sure you plastic surgeon is involved with the decision making regarding this repair.

Glen Brooks, MD
Springfield Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Bulge 1 year post abdominoplasty

+1

I agree with the other surgeons. You need a re-exploration and repair. It could be accomplished with a scope from the inside to assist in the repair.

Rick Rosen, MD
Norwalk Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Recurrent umbilical hernia

+1

I agree with the others that you have a recurrent umbilical hernia and would benefit from re-repair.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Umbilical Hernia?

+1

Thank you for the question and picture.

You have an umbilical hernia  that should be repaired ( hopefully with consideration given to reconstruction of the anatomy as well as the aesthetic appearance of the bellybutton).

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 759 reviews

Looks like the umbilical hernia has recurred

+1

Hello,

An umbilical hernia can be repaired in several ways including with or without the use of mesh.  It can also be done under local anesthesia or general anesthesia.  I would not worry about the umbilical hernia hurting your abdominal wall tightening.  

All the best,

Dr Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Umbilical hernia after abdominoplasty

+1

You may very effectively had the diastasis repaired properly, but it would appear that you still have a ventral or umbilical hernia.  This will still need to be reevaluated and repaired properly for you to be pleased with the results.

 

Good luck to you.

 

Frank Rieger M.D.  Tampa Plastic Surgeon

Francis (Frank) William Rieger, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.