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Will Abdominoplasty Improve Problems from Hernia Repair?

45 year old mother of 5, with twins at 5lbs 14oz & 6lbs. 4oz. I'm having full abdominoplasty on 1/21/1010. I had an umbilical hernia repair and then an inguinal hernia repair.

The ingunial hernia trapped 2 nerves, went back to remove 70% meshing 8 months later. Still more pain, went in for a laparoscopic surgery 6 months later and found that the messing balled. Still more pain in groin. Will abplasty help?

Doctor Answers (9)

Abdominoplasty is not the best solution to relieve groin pain

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The purpose of an abdominoplasty is to remove excess skin and fat, tighten your abdominal muscles and contour your midsection. The groin pain from your hernia surgery is unlikely to be improved by an abdominoplasty unless, as part of the procedure, the surgeon will attempt to remove some scar tissue which may be contributing to the nerve entrapment from your inguinal hernia repair.

You will still receive many benefits from an abdominoplsty, however, relief of pain from nerve entrapment is unlikely to be one of them. Make sure you discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon so you understand what he/she can accomplish with the surgery. Having realistic expectations of what can be achieved will greatly decrease the chances of disappointment later.

Good luck.

Munster Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Abdominoplasty is UNLIKELY to relieve Nerve Entrapment Pain

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The abdominoplasty would nicely flatten your tummy and narrow your waist but it is very unlikely to correct any nerve entrapment pain.

Such pain is hard to control and may persist even after the visible scar entrapment has been relieved. The original placement of the mesh most likely set the tone for the scarring. In many cases placing the mesh from INSIDE laparoscopically avoid the nerve scarring and entrapment seen with through the skin - Lichtenstein-LIKE repairs.

To find out how to relieve such pain, you will be best served seeing a hernia specialists who does a lot of these and sees a lot of complications (his and others). I would not look up to a Plastic surgeon regardless of how good he is to correct such a complication.

Good Luck.

Dr. P. Aldea

Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Don't expect abdominal hernia pain to improve with tummy tuck

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I would agree with my colleagues in stating that it is unlikely you will observe any significant improvements in pain or discomfort from an abdominoplasty despite the aesthetic outcome.

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Will Abdominoplasty improve pain from previous hernia repair?

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Hi there-

It sounds like you have pain from chronic sensory nerve involvement in scar tissue- called neuroma. These problems can (as you know) be very difficult to manage, and I doubt that your planned abdominoplasty would improve this pain.

In fact, it is important to realize that your tummy tuck may even make this pain worse in the short term, by creating more tension on your abdominal wall.

In cases like yours, my usual approach is to first sort out the existing pain by sending you for an evaluation with a pain specialist. They can often find the nerves involved in the causation of the pain and if so, numb them long term, making you pain free.

Once comfortable, you can then proceed with your planned tummy tuck without this concern.

I hope that helps you- good luck.

Web reference: http://www.DrArmandoSoto.com

Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Abdominoplasty and Hernia Pain

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The pain you have from your hernia surgery is likely due to scar tissue surrounding the nerves. You should not have high expectations that your planned abdominoplasty with improve this pain. The abdominoplasty will tighten your abdominal muscles and skin, but likely will not change the pain that you have from your previous surgery. Good luck.

Web reference: http://www.shaferplasticsurgery.com

New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Get evaluated for treatment of hernia repair

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This is a very hard question to answer over the Internet even with the terrific medical history you have provided. I recommend an in person evaluation with 3 boarded plastic surgeons. You see I would want to physically examine you than I could determine the appropriate steps to help you. Regards.

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Tummy tuck will not help your symptoms after an inguinal nerve repair

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While the abdominoplasty and hernia repair (umbilical, incisional, or ventral) can be performed at the same time, their indications and purposes need to be separated. An abdominoplasty or tummy tuck can address skin excess, lipodystrophy, and body contouring asymmetries. It does not address pain, complications, or relief from such that you've encountered after an inguinal hernia repair.

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Abdominoplasty for groin hernia pain

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Unless the doctor is specifically going to try to remove scar tissue around the hernia area you probably won't get any improvement from the tummy tuck. The tummy tuck does not specifically do anything for the inguinal area that would improve your pain. The area will be exposed and if anything can be tried it would be a good chance to explore this area to see if anything can be done. Make sure you talk with your surgeon and ask if he can do anything to help that area during the tummy tuck.

La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Abdominoplasty and hernia

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Abdominoplasty is a general term. It will only help your hernia problem if you clearly define what it is you want to be improved (i.e. pain, bulge, numbness, etc.) and only if the maneuvers contained within the "abdominoplasty" directly addresses those concerns. Some things can be help and some probably can't. Be sure to specific discuss your concerns with your surgeon.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.