Will Abdominal Mesh Interfere with Tummy Tuck or Liposuction?

I had a complete abdominal hysterectomy and cancer surgery (stage IIIc fallopian tube cancer) 3 years ago. Then, although following doc's orders to the letter, I had three incisional hernias from lifting weights. Now, I have mesh in mid-abdomen; got another (large 3 inch) hernia also in gym (have learned lesson). It is in upper abdomen. I would like to have hernia repaired and since under anesthesia, have tummy tuck or liposuction. Would existing mesh interfere or make that impossible? Who could do surgery?

Doctor Answers (8)

Mesh and abdominoplasty surgery

+2

Mesh unquestionably makes the surgery more difficult for the surgeon. This is not tummy tuck 101.

Depending on the comfort level of the plastic surgeon and the scope of your surgery, it may be advisable to have a general surgeon present for the surgery and have the plastic and general surgeons work in concert.

I am sure that consultations with fine surgeons such as the ones on RealSelf will give you answers to those questions.


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 91 reviews

Combined hernia repair and tummy tuck

+2

Dear Juno100, What you ask really requires a consultation because you first need to determine if you need liposuction or a tummy tuck. Many previous posts describe the differences between good candidates for each. Also, different hernias have different complexities to repair. Tightening the abdominal wall from a tummy tuck and thus increasing the intra-abdominal pressure may predispose to hernia recurrence. So, you can see that it is more complex than can be answered on line.

Tummy tucks and hernia surgery

+1

You can have the hernia repaired at the same time as your tummy tuck. You need a general surgeon to perform the hernia repair, while a plastic surgeon would do the tummy tuck. Check to make sure that both surgeons are board certified prior to proceeding, and be very careful with any lifting for at least six weeks after your surgey. Hope that everything goes well for you.

Nina S. Naidu, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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Hernia repair with simultaneous Tummy Tuck

+1

I feel before proceeding with either surgery, it would be wise to consult with both a board certified general and platic surgeon. Preferrably surgeons who have worked together in the past. The first question to be determined by your plastic surgeon would be which procedure, tummy tuck or liposuction, is the best choice for you. Once this has been decided, he/she can then confer with the general surgeon to plan and coordinate your surgery. Whether you would need a tummy tuck or liposuction, in conjunction with your hernia repair, these procedures can potentially be performed at the same surgical setting.

Dedending on the extent of the hernia repair, the combined procedures may be done on an outpatient basis allowing you to go home the same day. I have performed these procedures with general surgeons for people who are appropriate candidates on several occasions. The advantages of combined procedures are: one less anesthesia and one less recovery.

If mesh is required for repair of your hernia, this should not necessarily interfere with a tummy tuck or liposuction being performed at the same time. Talk to a board certified general and plastic surgeon to see if you are a candidate for a combined procedure. Make sure all of your questions are answered and you feel comfortable with your surgeons prior to proceeding.

Good luck!

David A. Robinson, MD
Munster Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Hernia Repair and Tummy Tuck

+1

it is impossible to comment specifically about your case since I have not examined you. However, in most cases we are able to repair abdominal hernias at the same time as liposuction. Some plastic surgeons, such as myself, are trained and board certified in both general surgery and plastic surgery. Therefore, we can do both portions of the procedure. Some plastic surgeons require a general surgeon to assist with the hernia portion. Good luck with your surgery.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

A More Complex Abdominal Reconstruction

+1

You will certainly need a palstic surgeon trained in general surgery, or the input and availability of a general surgeon for your best care.

The prosepct of finding a hernia in need of repair, plus mesh, will require some extra work.

Although I trained fully and was boarded in general surgery, I will enlist the help of a colleague to at least be in the hospital if I feel the intestines will have to be taken out of a hernia sac. (i.e. an incarcerated hernia).

A CT scan of the abdomen will sort out many of the issues beforehand.

John LoMonaco, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 168 reviews

You need examination by a plastic surgeon

+1

As Dr.Rand answer,you need a full examination. The repair of the hernia and tummy tuck can be done at the same time,but you need to have a full evaluation . The history of the multiple surgeries and failure and need for the mesh is a warning sign. You may have aweak muscle and this may complicate the case.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Prior history of hernia repairs and planning for tummy tuck (abodminoplasty)

+1

Being in Seattle, you may want to consult with Dr. Rand who has an excellent understanding of the complexity of the condition. Depending on the material used, (there are many different types of mesh) and where it was placed, repair may involve a variety of different approaches. If undergoing surgery and you are considering treatment by another surgeon, I would highly recommend that you gather copies of the operatibve records for your treating surgeon.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.