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5'2", 116 lbs, 47 years old. Am I a good candidate for tummy tuck? (photo)

I am 5'2 and 116 pounds and am 47. I have had three pregnancies and I work out several times a week. I typically wear a bikini and have always had nice definition. But over the last two years my skin has gotten looser and I am able to grab a lot of it if I bend forward. I am not sure if I am a good candidate for a tummy tuck as it seems that most candidates have more serious issues and maybe I should just accept these body changes for now.

Doctor Answers (7)

5'2", 116 lbs, 47 years old. Am I a good candidate for tummy tuck?

+1
    If you would like an improvement in the appearance of the abdomen, a tummy tuck would likely be appropriate.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 218 reviews

Who is a good candidate for tummy Tuck

+1
Thank you for your question and photo.  Because you're fit, not fat, but do have loose abdominal skin you're most likely a good candidate for a tummy tuck.  A formal in person examination and consultation will be required to determine whether you need a full or mini tummy tuck but full tummy tuck's are usually preferred by most surgeons.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Tummy Tuck

+1
You could be a great candidate for a tummy tuck. A tummy tuck (also called abdominoplasty) is a very popular cosmetic surgery procedure. A tummy tuck can be an effective tool for shaping and sculpting the body for better body appearance and improved self esteem. Sometimes no amount of diet and exercise can create a flat tummy. Tummy tuck plastic surgery actually tightens abdominal muscles and removes excess fat and skin from the stomach area to create a tighter, slimmer, smoother belly. A tummy tuck can be combined with other procedures such as liposuction of your waists or flanks (i.e. love handles) to fine tune your result.
 
I recommend you visit with an ASPS member plastic surgeon to further explore your options and to find out if you are a candidate for this procedure.
Best wishes!
Dr. Basu

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

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Candidate for tummy tuck?

+1
If the appearance of your abdomen concerns you enough, it can be cosmetically improved with a tummy tuck.

There are a variety of surgical procedures or combinations that can produce good results in patients with abdominal laxity, depending on multiple factors including their anatomy and degree of desired improvement: A mini tummy tuck, an umbilical float modified tummy tuck, a full abdominoplasty. Each of these can be performed with or without liposuction and with or without abdominal muscle repair. They produce different degrees of improvement.

Following the advice of anyone who would presume to tell you what to do based on two dimensional photos without taking a full medical history, examining you, feeling and assessing your tissue tone, discussing your desired outcome and fully informing you about the pros and cons of each option would not be in your best interest. Find a plastic surgeon that you are comfortable with and one that you trust and listen to his or her advice. The surgeon should be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS).You should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

Robert Singer, MD FACS

La Jolla, California

Robert Singer, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

#TummyTuck in a thin woman

+1
There are a vast array of women who come in to speak about tummy tuck. Many have more defined problems, some have less.  In either case, we spend an hour talking about all of the options, doing an exam and then tailoring specific options to the specific problems and tissues.  In your case, the discussion would revolve around the possibility of a full tummy tuck Vs. a mini TT.  There are few people who really would benefit the most from a mini but you may be one of them.  The difference between a mini and a full, to me, is just whether or not there is enough additional skin between the belly button and the pubic bone to allow all of it to be removed.  If the answer is yes then the best solution is almost always a full tummy tuck.  If the answer is no, we would discuss what other options are best.
In all of this, my message is to find someone in your area that you like and trust in an office that makes you feel comfortable. Make sure you are presented options and told why your best options or option is just that.  I would recommend seeing someone who does a modern version of a tummy tuck without drains and with long acting numbing medicine.
Best,
Dr. Pyle

Jeremy Pyle, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

TT on slender patients

+1
It is myth that Tt's are only for overweight or obese patients or who have extreme saggy skin. 
Pregnancies and sometimes just gaining/losing weight through life are enough to develop certain degree of flaccid skin on the abdomen and muscle. 
You are a beautiful candidate for a Full Tummy Tuck in order to remove the saggy skin and also a muscle repair to achieve a flatter abdomen and mainly a smaller waist which will match with you nice and slender body. The incision is placed very low to be easy to cover it under a sexy bikini. 
Be encouraged. You will be loving your results!!!
Dr. Cardenas

Laura Carmina Cardenas, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 99 reviews

Tummy tuck?

+1
from the photos  it looks like you may be a good candidate.  Visit with a few PS in your area to learn what options are available for you.  Sometimes having a petite frame without enough loose skin can be an issue in patients who have had prior c sections but an exam can tell you what your options are.

Mahlon Kerr, MD, FACS
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 87 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.