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Am I a Good Candidate for Areola Reduction Surgery? (photo)

I'm 19, weigh 145 pounds, and am in good health. My areolas have always been very large. They are not very circular and are more oval-shaped and I was wondering if that would be a problem for areola reduction. Also, I feel my breasts are very droopy for my age and was wondering about maxoplasty as well. I would rather not get a breast lift, but I've noticed that my breasts have gotten less perky over the last few years.

Doctor Answers (1)

R Areola Reduction Surgery?

+2

Thank you for your question and for the attached photo. You seem to be a good candidate for a breast lift, and that procedure would include the areolar reduction. An areolar reduction alone would entail what is usually called a peri-areoloar, or Benelli lift. Than would reduce your areolar size and remove some excess breast skin, but would leave you with nipples and areolas that are too low.

A vertical lift might be enough to get a better result, and that would add a vertical incision from the lowest point on the areola down to the breast fold. A consultation and exam will answer for you the best procedure. If adding the vertical incision is felt to still not be enough, the remaining incision to remove excess tissue would be in the breast fold. 

When you ready for an in person consultation, RealSelf has listings of surgeons in your area. You should consider cross referencing the listings from the The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (plasticsurgery dot org). A listing in the ASPS website assures you that your surgeon is not only board certified,  but also is a member in good standing of the major plastic surgery organization in the U. S.

Thank you for your question, best wishes.

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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