What Does Webbing Following Upper Eyelid Surgery Look Like?

Doctor Answers (3)

Webbing after upper eyelid surgery

+1

Webbing is a form of scar tissue contracture that usually occurs at corner of the eye closest to the nose, when an incision has been brought too far medially into that corner of the eye. While webbing typically forms at the inner corners of the eyes, they can form at the outer corners of the eyes as well.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Eyelid webbing

+1

Unfortunately, I do not have a picture that I can post for you to see...thank goodness! But, webbing of the upper eyelid skin occurs after blepharoplasty or eyelid surgery; skin and muscle is removed from the upper lid margin from outside to inside (near the nose). At the level of the nose, there exists a depression or concavity which the surgeon must be carefull to cross. Here the incision must be modified as "bow-stringing" (aka a web or bridging of skin) occurs due to scar contracture or shortening along this area. If it does occur, reconstructive surgery may be necessary utilizing a Z-plasty or scar relaxing technique.

If you feel you notice this after eyelid surgery, discuss the issue with your surgeon as he or she may be able to help you sooner rather than later.

I hope this helps!

Dr. C

John Philip Connors III, MD, FACS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Blepharoplasty and Webbing of the Upper Eyelid Post-Op

+1

Hi Canada in Montreal, or isn't it Montreal in Canada,

Webbing after blepharoplasty occurs in the upper medial (nose side) area of the lid. The skin appears to be pulled causing a web that can be unsightly. It should be avoided during the blepharoplasty by creating the incision and closing the wound properly. It is much easier to avoid initially than to have to go back and repair.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.