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Smoking Before Breast Augmentation Lead to Major Complications?

Hello, im having Breast Augmentation on Tuesday, November 17, 2009. I have smoked 10 cigarettes during the 2-week period, 4 in the past 6 days. Leading up to my surgery will this lead to major complications?

Doctor Answers (13)

Smoking and breast implant surgery

+2

Smoking prior to any plastic surgery procedure can lead to complications such as infection, poor scarring, capsular contracture (hard scar tissue) and wound healing problems, to list a few. It is recommended to stop smoking approximately 2-8 weeks before and 2-8 weeks after your elective surgical procedure. You should also avoid being around other people who smoke during the perioperative period (second hand smoke).

If you have smoked the week leading up to your surgery, I would inform your plastic surgeon and consider rescheduling your procedure.

Best wishes,

Dr. Bruno

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 122 reviews

Smoking and surgery

+2

In some studies, smoking leads to a 50% increase in the complication rate of almost any surgery.  Breast augmentation although not as problematic as some other surgeries like tummy tucks or facelifts, can still have major complications from cigarette smoking.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Smoking and Breast Augmentation

+2

Smoking increases risks for all surgery, but some more than others. With breast augmentation, the problems are more pulmonary than related to healing. I personally do not have a big problem performing BA in a smoker. I will not, on the other hand, perform tummy tucks, breast reductions, or facelifts in the usual fashion on active smokers.

Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Smoking before breast augmentation and complications

+1

As you can imagine, smoking is bad for breast augmentation, (and surgery in general). Most would say that you have a significantly higher rate of wound complications. When one takes a drag on a cigarette, the chemicals cause vasoconstriction. Wound healing is all about getting blood flow and oxygen to the tissue. I believe that you will find that each doctor may have a different opinion as to how long you need to be off cigarettes. Some will test for nicotine in the system. Best to talk with a board certified plastic surgeon. Also best to quit smoking, (for a variety of other health reasons as well).

Web reference: http://www.jjrothmd.com/procedures/breast-augmentation

Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Smoking Before Surgery Increases Risk

+1

Chances are that you will do fine, but the more nicotine you consume by smoking the more risk you put yourself in. Other factors also add up such as being overweight, on Birth Control Pills or hormones, or if you have a medical condition that causes hypercoagulation.

Most experts unanimously agree that smoking increases the rate of  breast augmentation surgical complications significantly. Just about all plastic surgeons strongly recommend  women  to stop smoking and all nicotine products well in advance of breast augmentation with breast implants.  Many plastic surgeons recommend stopping all tobacco products several months prior to surgery.A scientific article in the Archives of Internal Medicine indicated that, among all forms of surgery, quitting smoking eight weeks prior was never associated with an increased risk of complications.

Here is the reason why: the nicotine in cigarettes and other tobacco products (including Nicorette gum, patches, etc) is a vasoconstrictor, meaning it makes the Smoking is a significant multiplier of many potential complications following surgery and breast augmentation with implants are no exception. Nicotine from smoking causes blood vessels to vasoconstrict ( tighten up). Over time, these constricted arteries and capillaries deliver less blood to the breast tissue which is needed for normal healing. Smokers therefore have an increased incidence of higher likelihood of complications such as infection, and in particular capsular contracture (hardening and distortion of the implants). General complications of surgery such as blood clots, anesthetic problems such as pneumonia are also increased.

 

In young patients you will probably statistically avoid these complications, why tempt fate by increasing your odds that something bad will happen.On a long term basis, smoking also causes accelerated aging of the skin and loss of elasticity. Hopefully these reasons will help give you the will power and courage to stop smoking.

Web reference: http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?volume=171&issue=11&page=983

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Don't smoke if you want a breast augmentation

+1

Smoking is associated with necrosis of the skin, poor wound healing, unsightly scar formation---not to mention lung cancer.  Be honest with yourself and with your plastic surgeon.  If you are a smoker, consider a smoking cessation program and then reward yourself with the surgery that you've always wanted.  Don't assume that you will be the patient who will escape these complications because nicotine is an equal opportunity punisher.  Also, know that smoking is implicated in premature aging of the skin so, if you stop, you will be less likely to need facial rejuvenation surgery and, if you elect to have that surgery, will be a much better candidate.  Wishing you every success in overcoming this problem and leading a long and healthy life!

New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Smoking and surgery

+1

Due to the increased ricks and healing concerns, I ask all of my patients to cease smoking at least 4 weeks prior to surgery. Hopefully, after the patient has quit for four weeks, they will become permanent non-smokers. The end goal is a safe and successful surgery. Best of luck! 

Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Best to not smoke perioperatively. Don't use nicotine patches.

+1

Smoking increases the cardio-pulmonary (heart-lung) rsik of your anesthetic and causes problems with healing of the tissues atter surgery. Best to stop as soon as possible before and not restart after surgery at least and not healing complete (6-8week after surgery).  Don't nicotine replacements such as patches or gum as it will negatively impact healing.

Montreal Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Smoking is never good prior to elective, cosmetic surgery

+1

There are varying degrees of smoking as well as a varying degrees of complications. To minimize complications from any surgery, especially elective plastic surgery, smoking is not recommended. This is not to say that smoking is an absolute contraindication to undergoing cosmetic surgery, but the best advice is not to smoke at all, or for at least three weeks prior to undergoing a procedure. After the surgery. It is best stay away from smoking for two months to allow the tissues to heal maximally. The negative effects of smoking cannot be over emphasized for the wound healing process.

San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Stop smoking before Breast Augmentation

+1

What foreseeable, potentially avoidable complications WOULD YOU be willing to accept? What complications do you consider minor?

Smoking is associated with a fall in critical blood flow and delivery of oxygen to the tissues. Blood vessels in active OR passive smokers are usually in a state of spasm which makes smokers much more likely to have tissue death, wound separation and widening with poor scarring among other complications.

I would STOP smoking if I were you.

Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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