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When is Dysport FDA Approval Expected?

When is the Dysport launch supposed to happen?  Are they still waiting for FDA approval?  When is Dysport approval expected?

Doctor Answers (20)

Dysport FDA approval - April 25th

+4

Dysport has been around in Europe for about as long as Botox and is approved in 28 countries. However, Medilcis first application was rejected by the FDA last January 2008. The FDA said that they wanted more information before approval.

I have heard that they will be meeting April 25th to reconsider the application but who knows whether this will take place and if so, whether approval will be granted.


Virginia Beach Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Dysport FDA Approval

+1

Dysport received FDA approval in April 2009, and is now widely available. Botox remains the preferred choice for most patients and for most experienced and expert injectors.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Dysport availability

+1

Dysport is available now and is a great alternative to Botox which has been very successful int he US market.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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When is Dysport FDA Approval Expected?

+1

Dysport (aka Reloxin) was approved in the US in April 2009.  It is a great alternative to Botox, has a quicker onset of action, and lasts longer in some areas of the face.  We're conducting a study comparing Dysport to Botox, and the results should be available in January or 2011.

Ramtin Kassir, MD, NY/NJ facial plastic surgeon

Ramtin Kassir, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Dysport is AWESOME

+1

Dysport is already FDA approved and works great.  I essentially use it exclusively.  Here's why

1. Dysport takes effect in 24-48h.  Compare to Botox - 4-7 days

2. Dysport last 4 months, compare to 3 months for Botox

3.  Dysport is cheaper!!!!

Raghu Athre, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Dysport was approved by the FDA in April 2009

+1

Dysport, a Botox competitor, was approved by the FDA in April 2009. 

In my experience, it offers a faster onset of action (1-2 days for Dysport vs. 3-5 days for Botox).  I also like it better than Botox for crows' feet wrinkles.

As of now, I generally recommend Botox for the glabella (verticall lines between the eyes) and Dysport for the crows' feet.  Either works well for horizontal forehead wrinkles.

Ronald Friedman, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Dysport has been available since early 2009 and works great!

+1

We have been using Dysport since the early part of 2009 when it received FDA approval.  It is an excellent alternative to Botox.  Here in NJ, we offer both Dysport and Botox to our patients.  They select whichever works better for them.  It is always nice to have alternatives.

Dr. Parham Ganchi - NJ Plastic Surgeon

Parham Ganchi, PhD, MD
Wayne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Dysport is here and I love it!

+1

I've been using it since April 2009, when it was FDA-approved here in the US.  Have had very nice results.  The company has also priced its product very competitively and has rebates (up to $150--first treatment must be done by Sept 30, 2010).

Carmen Kavali, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Dysport is available now!

+1

Dysport has been approved by the FDA and it is being injected by many injectors today. Find someone with some good experience with it and have a go.

Chris Thiagarajah, MD
Washington DC Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

FDA approval obtained

+1

FDA approval was obtained for Dysport in April of 2009.  I have used it on hundreds of patients for facial wrinkles and feel that is a very safe alternative to Botox.

Mandy Lynn Warthan, MD
Dallas Dermatologist

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.