Male Breast Reduction with Areola Reduction?

I want know if Male breast reduction procedure can be done simultaneously with areola reduction?

Doctor Answers 20

Areolar reduction

I do not perform areolar reduction at the same time as gynecomastia surgery. The complication rate for simultaneous areolar reduction and gynecomastia surgery is logrythmically increased. Areolar size is reduced by the gynecomastia surgery.

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews


It is rare that I would reduce areola on first stage. The addition of more scars often outweighs the benefit. The areola often to reduce in size naturally with tissue contraction. At a later stage one can always go in under local and reduce areola it if it continues to be bothersome.   

Tim Neavin, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Male Breast Reduction with Areola Reduction


Thanks for the post. Two things generally happen to the areola after gynecomastia: they get smaller and they get darker. This happens to a variable degree from one patient to another. It is due to the remove of the excess tissue that had been pushing the areola outward. I typically do not perform areola reductions at the same time for this reason and also for a more important reason that it can potentially risk disruption of the blood supply to the nipple and areola. 


Dr. Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews


Yes, it is very common for male breast reduction and areola reduction to be performed at the same time.

Male Breast Reduction with Areola Reduction?

Depending on the extent of the surgery intended, there can be an increased risk with wound healing issues, but both procedures CAN be performed together.  Good luck and be safe.

John T. Nguyen, MD, FACS, FICS
Double Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

John Nguyen, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Male Breast Reduction with Areola Reduction - one or two procedures?

Yes it is possible to do both procedures at the same time. However, most often I find that the it is best to do it separately. For on reason, sometimes when I anticipate two surgeries - the second one is not needed. When the skin retracts for example after liposuction of the breasts so does the areola (which is a skin appendage) which may satisfy your wishes.

For males with very large breasts staged procedures (more than one procedure) may be required. For example, the first procedure may be liposuction, then several weeks to months later after skin contraction has occurred, a separate procedure is done to remove excess skin. By doing a staged procedure, often the final scars are less.

Larry Nichter, MD, FACS

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Gynecomastia Surgery and Areola Reduction

Thank you for the question.

Both of these procedures can technically be done same time.  However I have found that correction of gynecomastia and areola reduction surgery done at the same time does carry increased risks  compared to either one of the procedures done separately.  This increased risk is related to decreased blood flow to the nipple/areola.

Sometimes the areola shrinks enough with the  gynecomastia surgery that the areola reduction surgery becomes unnecessary.

Please make sure you're working with a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

The areola will shrink as a by-product of male breast reduction

You may very well not need a formal reduction of the areola.  Removal of the breast tissue is often accompanied by a decrease in the diameter of the areola.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Areola reduction with Gynecomastia

Gynecomastia can most definitely be performed at the same time with areola reduction. Performing both procedures simultaneously will not add to the recovery time of either procedure.

Ivan Thomas, MD (retired)
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.