Male Body Builder Chest Fat

Not sure if I have gyno and I've never taken steroids but I've got a well trained chest. My chest does have some fat puffiness and I look alot like some doctor's "before" patients for gyno. Instead of surgery, I wonder if I should take something to lower my estrogen?

Doctor Answers (11)

Chest Fat in a Male Bodybuilder

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Gynecomastia is more common than many people think, occurring transiently in 30 - 70% of men as they go through adolescence.  The majority of cases resolve--up to 95%. But even 5% of 30% is a big number, and if the condition doesn't resolve after puberty, it may persist as glandular or fatty tissue in spite of a rigorous training program and full pectoral development.  This can result in puffiness of the nipple as well as general fullness in the lower chest.  Hormone levels in most instances are normal, since the problem really developed long ago.  Therefore, hormonal manipulation, such as lowering estrogen, will have no effect and might have other side-effects.  If gynecomastia is a late development outside of puberty, then an evaluation is necessary to rule out other causes. If it's related to steroid use, then the cause is readily apparent, and perhaps stopping the drug will allow for resolution.  In most cases, however, if the gynecomastia is well established, surgery is required to correct it.


Newton Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Hormone levels with gynecomastia

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SEE VIDEO BELOW FOR SAMPLE SURGICAL RESULTS:

If you have questions about your hormone levels, you should first seek evaluation by your primary care physician or an endocrinologist to verify your endogenous hormone levels first.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Hormonal Therapy Will Not Be Effective For You; Subcutaneous Mastectomy Necessary

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                  It’s not unusual for weight lifters to develop gynecomastia. This may occur for a variety of reasons including the use of anabolic steroids and dietary supplements. In addition, hypertrophy of the pectoralis muscles and lowering of body fat percentages can make existing gynecomastia more noticeable.

                  This group of patients is very sensitive to body image and for this reason gynecomastia represents a significant problem. Although the idea of hormonal therapy sounds attractive, it would not be effective in this group of patients since the majority have normal hormone levels.

                  In the vast majority of weight lifters, a subcutaneous mastectomy will be necessary. When this problem occurs patients should discontinue any steroids or dietary supplements that they may be taking. Consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon would also be appropriate. 

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 74 reviews

Chest fat in a male bodybuilder

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In the male bodybuilding population, we can see patients to have access of fat or tissue in the nipple area area in some of these patients who are very thin or have a low fat density, it is important to determine if this tissue is the result of medications or other chemicals. The patient should be counseled on this and encouraged to avoid such medications. In male breast reduction patients, we can often easily excised this tissue in a small procedure using local anesthesia and a small incision around the base of the areola.

Pat Pazmino, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

Self-Treatment for Gynecomastia not a good idea

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Treating yourself is really not a good idea. This is true EVEN if you are a doctor.

If you are bothered by your appearance, see a Plastic surgeon (www.PlasticSurgery.org). He could explain to you what your options may be.

In general Gyno / Gynecomastia (Men breasts, moobs etc) is extremely common and does not have a ready diagnosis. Moreover, in some cases where a diagnosis does exist it can be caused by MANY factors and disorders , only some of which are related to increased estrogens.

I would NOT take ANY medication without a full workup and without a doctor's permission. doing is is needlessly dangerous and you may be treating a condition which is NOT the cause of YOUR Gyno, IF you have one.

Dr. P. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Hormones and body builders

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Treating gynecomastia with hormones when it is not indicated is a bad thing. If you are concerned about hormone levels, I would see an endocrinologist. More than likely it is not a hormone problem.  It may be amenable to surgical procedures such as liposuction or direct excision.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

No hormones

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Do not mess with your hormones.  If you have a bit of fat or extra breast tissue in the chest, it would be better to either ignore it, or if it bothers you , likely get it liposuctioned.  Messing with the hormones is a BAD idea.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Male chest fat

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You may or may not have gynecomastia. More than likely you have a combination of male breast tissue and fat. There are many causes of male breast tissue. The most common that I see is anabolic steroid use. There are however other causes such as marijuana smoking, excessive alcohol intake, and certain medications.

Some tumors can cause this as well. Because in some instances the tumors can be cancerous and lethal, I recomend that you follow up with your primary care doctor for a full evaluation and lab work. Obviously, the earlier the treatment the better, so don't delay.

You may be a candidate for improvement thorugh a combination of liposuction and excision. This procedure removes the breast tissue and recontours the skin to provide a flatter, more defined chest.

I recomend that you seek consultation with a board certifide plastic surgeon once you have been fully evaluated by your primary care doctor.

Michael Diaz, MD
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Check hormonal levels first and clinical exam before medications

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Hello trevor,

You might want to check some homone levels first before taking any medications. Your primary care physician could get some blood tests and a clinical exam that would rule out any hormonal factors. Once this is done, your next step is to seek a plastic surgery consultation if still bothers you. Liposuction is the easy treatment for this condition.

I wish you all the best.

Hisham Seify, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.