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How is Hollowness on and Below the Orbital Rim Treated?

Everything I have read about tear troughs seems to refer to volumizing the orbital area by placing filler underneath the eye muscle. However, how are patients treated when their hollowness is on or below the orbital rim? I have hollowness starting from my the top of my orbital rim to the top of my upper cheeks. Can fillers like Restylane be successfully molded on such a thin-skinned, bony area?

Doctor Answers (3)

Juvederm, Restylane, and Radiesse are good fillers for this area

+2

Fillers such as Juvederm and Restylane ($550/syringe) or Radiesse ($830/syringe) do good for the tear troughs on the upper cheeks.  The fillers should be put in in 2-3 sessions a few days to a week apart and require 2-3 syringes of filler. 

Web reference: http://www.drdavidhansen.com

Beverly Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Hollowness under and over the orbital rim

+1

Hi Sunshine26,

Hollowness around the orbital rim is often successfully treated with fillers. The area you are referring to- the naso jugal fold- which separates the lower eyelid from the upper cheek is actually a great place for fillers. If done correctly with small amounts injected at a time, the result can be very nice. I agree that treatment should be spaced apart for several treatments due to some of the swelling effect followed by these hyaluronic acid fillers. Be sure to go to an experienced dermatologist or plastic surgeon as injections in this area are certainly operator dependent and the thin skin of the area is more vulnerable to lumps and bumps as well as bruising.

New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Fillers in the orbital region

+1

Fillers such as restylane or juvederm can be used successfully to fill in the tear trough area. This can also be combined with surgery that can release the soft tissue attachments in the area.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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