Benelli Mastopexy with Implants Enough for Breasts with Pseudo Ptosis?

Would a Benelli lift be enough? I would also be getting a 340cc HP textured silicone breast implants along with the breast lift. In the previous consultations, I was told I almost have a pseudo ptosis. My nipple is 19cm. from the collarbone. I did breast feed and have some stretch marks from my first pregnancy. I have attached a picture, both front and side views. I really want to have as few scars as possible. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (18)

Glandular ptosis can sometimes be treated with breast augmention without mastopexy

+4

There are numerous types of breast lifts available and all have advantages and disadvantages. Based on your description and photographs, I would expect that a Benelli type lift would be adequate. Be informed of potential problems associated with this procedure such as occasional reduced projection and “flattening” of the breasts. Also, the scars may not always be ideal with scattered cases of gathering of tissue along the incision.

If you goal is to avoid scarring, it is conceivable that you could receive an acceptable result with breast augmentation alone. If you tried this option and decided you still needed some type of lift, this could be performed later as a secondary procedure.

I hope this information is of some benefit to you. Good luck on your future surgery.

Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Biplanar breast augmentation without breast lift should work for you

+2
Thank you for your question.  I agree with others that I do not think a breast lift is necessary based on your photographs.  A biplanar breast augmentation alone should give you a nice result.  If a breast lift is needed it would be better to wait and do it as a second procedure.

Web reference: http://www.realself.com/question/breast-lift-scars1#1251903

Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Pseudoptosis treatment: to lift or not to lift

+1
Treating pseudoptosis can be done with implants with or without a lift.  Factors that need to be taken into account are amount of lift needed, overall breast shape, volume desired and willingness to accept scars. Perhaps the "best" solution would be a modest augmentation with a vertical lift, but this requires accepting scarring on the breast. The alternative plan would be to use a high profile implant only and have a larger augmentation to get as much lift out of the implant as possible. It's a matter of weighing pros and cons and making a decision that you are comfortable with. 
New Jersey Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast lift

+1
Based on your photographs you would be fine to have a augmentation with a peri-areolar mastopexy. However you would need to be examined to confirm this as it will depend on the laxity of your skin and the degree of excess skin. You may need a short vertical extension if you have poor skin tone.
A combined mastopexy augment will give you a longer lasting result than a pure augmentation with a high/extra projection anatomical implant. (this would be another potential option) 
I suggest you see a specialist plastic surgeon/board certified plastic surgeon who will be able to discuss the most suitable option once she/he has examined you. 
Best wishes.


Australia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

You need a mastopexy?

+1
You have a different problem than many.  True ptosis is when  the entire breast drops including the nipple and areola.  Pseudoptosis is where the bottom drops out, but the upper skin where the nipple and areola is maintains it's height. I think an implant will answer your problem for awhile, however, a vertical incision below your nipple-areola will be necessary to tighten the area that is bottoming out now. The weight of the implant will likely make that worse over time. Tightening around your areola will not be a long term answer in my opinion.
Oshkosh Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Breast lift and implants

+1

Hi,

 If you want the best result in your case (you do seem to have pseudo ptosis), then do a mastopexy with a decrease in your breast envleope surface area and do the implants.  Your skin is very light and if you can accept the vertical scar, then you will be able to raise your nipple to a more youthful position with the restoration of the volume with the implants.

  All other discussions will have limitations but if you cannot accept that vertical scar, then you need to accept the limitations of other choices.

Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

If you have a lift, the vertical technique balances results with less scars

+1

The Benelli procedure is controversial.  Many plastic surgeons don't use it because the scar around the areola tends to spread despite the permanent suture and it does not adequately take up extra slack of the lower pole.  The vertical technique is better.  It involves a scar around the areola and then straight down, the lollipop scar.  Your nipples do not need to any higher.  You could just have implants alone and accept some sagging and wide areolae.  Or you could have implants with a vertical lift, taking care not to elevate your nipples, but reducing slack skin from the lower poles and making the areolae smaller (keep in mind that implants make them even larger).  Definitely you do not want the inverted-T technique with its excessive scarring and tendency to widen the lower poles.  It's important that you become well-educated about breast lifts because there is a lot of misinformation out there.  You may wish to read this portion of my website.

Web reference: http://www.swansoncenter.com/content/ideal-breast/procedures/breast-lift/patient-photographs.asp

Kansas City Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Breast Lifting Techniques?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

Your pictures demonstrate breast hypoplasia and asymmetric breast ptosis.  it is possible that you will do well with circumareola mastopexy surgery only;  however, this can only be determined accurately after direct physical examination and a thorough discussion of your goals.

I would caution you to make sure you make decisions based on achieving your final goals (with attention to factors such as breast contour and longevity of  results) as opposed to simply minimizing scars.  Educate yourself about the pros and cons of each type of procedure and select a plastic surgeon that can demonstrate a significant experience with the variety of breast augmentation/breast lifting  operations available.

Best wishes.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/Procedure_breastLiftAug.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 628 reviews

Augmentation No Lift

+1

In your photos your nipples point slightly up and I doubt they are below the level of your breast fold. You have some minor areolar asymmetry but if it does not bother you and your nipples are high enough, I would avoid a Benelli lift. Your breast have deflated with loss of volume. Augmentation with gel implants placed through an inframammary incision should produce a nice result for you without the added risks of poor areolar scarring or widening  and a large implant could be used. Because of your thin skin, I would use silicone gel breast implants.

Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Benelli lift with silicone implants for breast droopiness (ptosis)

+1

Based on your photos, I actually think that you are an ideal candidate for a duel plane augmentation with a benelli lift since you do have glandular ptosis with a reasonably positioned nipple areola complex. Combining these two procedures would eliminate the pseudo-ptosis, slightly diminish the skin envelope and minimize the contact between the breast and the upper abdomen. It would also slightly diminish the size of the nipple areola which may be reasonable/desired in your case. (n.b. I personally prefer to use smooth silicone prosthesis in cases such as yours).  

Web reference: http://www.delucaplasticsurgery.com/breast-augmentation-albany-ny/

Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.