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I Am 6.5 Weeks Post Tummy Tuck and Have Very Large Hard Abdomen Lump, Difficult to Breathe, Is this Normal?

With this VERY large lump (basketball size) in my upper abdomen, I am having a LOT of difficulty breathing (can only take shallow breaths/feels like SUFFOCATION) I feel like I'm being crushed under my own skin and have also felt heart palpitations. I've been to the ER and have had x-ray and ct scan which they said look normal. I'm at my witts end.. and do not know how much longer I can live like this. Have you ever heard of this? Would ultrasound b better? Any help would be VERY appreciated.

Doctor Answers (4)

Complication after tummy tuck

+1

Thank you your question.  I am very sorry to hear you are having problems.

This is impossible to diagnose over the Internet.  I cannot understand how a basketball sized mass appears "normal" on a CT scan unless the CT scan did not include the area where the mass is located. By that I mean could the CT scan have been of the chest since you describe difficulty breathing and did not include the abdomen.

You need to follow up with your surgeon, sooner than later.  If he or she is unavailable you may want to consider getting a second opinion.

Good luck.

 


Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

You need to see your surgeon

+1

You need to see your surgeon about these issues. They sound serious and can not be treated through internet.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Large Abdominal Lump after Tummy Tuck

+1

Based on what you describe, a basket ball sized lump but a normal CT scan, something does not make sense. Contact you plastic surgeon to sort this out or ask for a 2nd opinion.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Complication after Tummy Tuck?

+1

I'm sorry to hear about your situation.

Unfortunately,  there is no “magic bullet”. You need to follow-up with your plastic surgeon ( sooner than scheduled if necessary)  to rule out a  potential complications. There is no replacement of an in-person examination for patients In your situation.  Physical examination will be key.

Once all  potential (phyiscal) complications have been ruled out with physical examination and imaging studies,  then attention should be paid to any role anxiety  is playing. Again, this will come down to good old fashion history and physical examination.  If this turns out to be the case, your surgeon may be able to suggest remedies,  potentially use medications,  and/or refer you to the appropriate consultants.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.