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600cc-650cc Implants - Too Big?

I am 5'10" 160 lbs. I have nursed three children. I have am worried that 600-650 cc implants are too big however my surgeon showed me that they fit my chest wall and with me having large hips and broad shoulders they will look big but I can pull it off. I was a D before kids and with weight lose and children I am left with skim that fits an A cup bra. HELP!!!

Doctor Answers (11)

Implant Selection Process

+1

Larger implants increase the risk of complications such as implant malposition, which can be very difficult to correct longterm.  Unfortunately, there is not a general rule of thumb or objective criteria to implant selection.

Your plastic surgeon will perform several measurements of your chest wall and breast anatomy and determine a range of implants that both fit your chest wall and reach your desired goals.

The next step is to try on this range of implants in the office with your doctor.   The key to this success is showing your surgeon the body proportion you desire with a bra sizer and allowing your surgeon to guide you to the right implant.   It will be much easier to communicate in implant cc's than cup size when determining the appropriate implant for you.
I wish you a safe recovery and fantastic result.

Dr. Gill


Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

When is a breast implant for augmentation surgery too big?

+1

This is considerably larger than the average implant but your measurements indicate that you are not the average sized patient. Therefore this could be a reasonable size for you.

There are numerous increased risks associated with this, and I am sure I will not even touch on half of them, but consider the following.

The size of the implant has been associated with:

1.Increased risk of loss of nipple sensation
2.Increased risk for long term breast ptosis (sagging)
3.Increased risk for chest wall deformation (curving of the ribs)
4.Increased risk of rippling or palpable /visible creases
5.Increased risk of lower pole tissue attenuation (thinning of the tissues of the breast)
6.Increased risk of secondary revisionary procedures
These are a few of the risks off the top of my head. Please discuss with your surgeon.

Most importantly, remember that although you are seeking breast enlargement, many women present complaining of breast overgrowth desiring breast reduction. These women report limited physical activity, neck/back/shoulder pain, shoulder grooving from bra straps, numbness in the fingers, rashes beneath the breasts, etc.

Many of these women feel significant relief with reductions as small as 300 cc yet you are considering adding twice that to your breasts. Think it over carefully.

I hope this helps.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Large Implants May Cause Problems

+1

The number sounds big.  My main concern for you would be over time will you skin be able to support that size implant.  I would recommend gathering other opinions by consults a couple of other board certified plastic surgeons.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Large breast implants need to be considered carefully

+1

Without photos, it's difficult to give you a great answer given the details you provided. That said, at 5’10” and 160 pounds - and if your chest wall is quite wide - then a large prosthesis will appear less dramatic on you than a significantly smaller prosthesis in a petite woman. I have an excellent case using 600cc and will upload it soon to my new website. Of course, if your problem is one of significant skin excess, then placing a slightly smaller prosthesis with some sort of mastopexy (lift) may be more appropriate. Unfortunately it is difficult to make that judgement call without any pictures to evaluate. If your base width is in the 16.0cm – 17.0cm range and with large hips, then a prosthesis in the 500cc – 600cc range would certainly be reasonable but you do run the risk with the significantly larger bra size of appearing a bit heavier.

William F. DeLuca Jr, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 105 reviews

Breast augmentation

+1

In my opinion, it is.  The tissues will stretch and will cause problems later.  I would recommend smaller implants.

Shahin Javaheri, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

600-650 cc implants

+1

It is very difficult to comment on the volume of implant that would best fit you, but I would have to say that 600-650cc is pretty large.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Huge breast implants are a huge mistake.

+1

Hi.

We never use more than 500cc's. Very large breast implants stretch your tissues and age very badly.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

650 cc. implants?

+1

You can answer your own question by taking two ziplock bags and filling each with 650 ml. of water( approx  3 1/4 lbs.)and put them in an D cup bra and put it on to see how it would feel to carry that weight around for the rest of your life.

Without pics I would say that a breast lift with smaller implants is the way to go for the" long haul" Remember, what is an asset in your 30's can be a defecit in your 60's.

Barry H. Dolich, MD
Bronx Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

600cc-650cc Implants - Too Big?

+1

Really needs a posted photo. Best to see in person 3 boarded surgeons in your area. Best from MIAMI Dr. Darryl J. Blinski

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Implant size

+1

"implantology" can be tricky.  The numbers don't matter as much as the dimensions, and whether the implant fits your frame.  That said, the heavier and larger the implant, the higher the risk of long term complications such as bottoming out or malposition. 

David A. Lickstein, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.