Ask a doctor

5 wks Post Lower Bleph the Lids are Asymmetrical. Will This Change? (photo)

My right eye was always a little worse than the left. he told me he put some fat into the left eye because the wall was so thin.not sure he did it to both eyes or to wrong one.The left eye looks puffy and the right eye looks hollower. not sure which eye looks worse/better. If they were just symmetrical it would help.The junction where lower lid meets cheek is pronounced more on the right and not at all on the left and uneven. He gave shots to reduce puffiness/bumps yesterday. Go back in 2 mo's.

Doctor Answers (7)

Healing after eyelid surgery

+3

It is not unusual to note some asymmetry at 5 weeks after eyelid surgery.  It may take another 6 to 12 weeks for for the swelling/scarring to resolve and to be able to see the long term results of your procedure.  I agree with my colleagues, that the best advice is to allow time for the eyelids to heal.  At this point it should be safe to apply 1% hydrocortizone cream to the eyelids.  The cream may help decrease inflammation and speed up the healing process.   However, check with your surgeon first to see if this would be OK and if they reccomend any other treatments.


San Jose Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Eye asymmetry

+3

It sounds like your doctor is keeping a close "eye" on you( no pun intended).  It may take several months for things to settle down. But remember,  no two eyes are the same.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Honestly, you are so swollen at this point it is hard to know precisely what is going on.

+3

Under these circumstances I recommend being patient (although being patient is an impossibly difficult task).  There is nothing dramatic that appears to be going on.  Tincture of time is very helpful.  Please be aware that in the before photo the right high projects more than the left side.  As you heal this difference may be more obvious. Consider reposting your photos in a couple of months if you are still concerned.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

You might also like...

Blepharoplasty asymmetry

+2
Your lower lids are still very swollen for five weeks postop. Give it some time for the swelling to go down. There is a plausible reason for this, namely, the fat injection. Time is a very important healer. I do not know what type of "shots" your surgeon used for the swelling, but it is better, at this time, to wait prior to rushing to any further treatment. Facial asymmetry is the norm and not unusual.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Eyelid healing

+2

You should wait at least 3 months, or better 6 months, for complete healing before assessing how the eyelids look.  That's how long healing takes.  Then you can discuss with your surgeon.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Asymmetry 5 weeks after Blepharoplasty

+2

You may still have some swelling at this time. Since you just received an injection for swelling, give it some time to work and see if it improves.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

5 wks Post Lower Bleph the Lids are Asymmetrical. Will This Change?

+1

 I have performed Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery) for over 20 years and IMHO, your eyes still seem to have residual swelling from the lower eyelid surgery.  This typically resolves by 3 months postop.  I'd wait to see what the lower eyelids look like at that time before making any final assessment of the results.  In the meantime, follow the instructions of the plastic and cosmetic surgeon that did your lower eyelid surgery.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.