Ask a doctor

Is 56 Too Old For a Lower Body Lift? I've Lost 70 Lbs.

I lost 70 pounds thru bariatric surgery and am scheduled for lbl in 2 weeks am i too old or should i just live with excess tissue.

Doctor Answers (8)

Age and body lift safety

+1

Great job!! And NO its definitely not too old!!  I would wait for 6 months of weight stability before you have surgical procedures. Unfortunately there is no effective non-surgical method.  However, a body lift can truly change your life. Excess abdominal fat  and skin is removed, the abdomen and your core is tightened, your hips are raised and defined and your buttock has new definition and shape.  The combination is powerful and the results are immediate. I would do the body lift first, then stage procedures every 4-6 months. Healing time is 2-4 weeks. The most important thing is safety. Please don't compromise on this! See a board certified plastic surgeon


Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Age is not as Important as Your State of Health

+1

Hi there-

While a Lower Body Lift, being one of the longer operations done for improvement in the body contour of patients like yourself, does therefore have a relatively higher level of risk than shorter, smaller operations, there is no reason to believe that (all other things being equal) your age necessarily increases these risks to the point of making the operation contra-indicated for you.

More important than your age is your overall state of health, the details of the procedure planned (which will depend on who is doing your surgery), and how carefully you are prepared for surgery by your surgeon and medical doctor.

These are among the more important reasons why choosing your surgeon carefully and based on the appropriate criteria (education, training, experience, skill, talent, history of ethical behavior) is so important.

As long as you are in good health,  you have chosen your surgeon appropriately (and not based on his great low price), and you are prepared well for surgery, you should be able to enjoy a safe and positive experience and outcome.

Good luck!

Armando Soto, MD, FACS
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 98 reviews

"360 body lift" "circumferential body lift "plastic surgery after weight loss"

+1

The most important thing about a 360 body lift is your general health, not your age.  As long as you are healthy and your internist or cardiologist has "cleared" you for the 360 body lift, I believe the surgery should be safe.  For patients who are over 55 years old undergoing a 360 body lift, I usually obtain additional tests.  These tests include a stress test and a carotid duplex test. Not all plastic surgeons order these additional tests.  This is my personal protocol and is based solely on my experience.  Good luck with your 360 body lift.  Sincerely, Dr. Katzen

J. Timothy Katzen, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

You might also like...

Lower Body Lift and Age?

+1

Congratulations on your significant weight loss; you should be proud of this accomplishment.

No, chronological age is not a contraindication to the planned procedure. Prior to surgery however I would suggest a evaluation by your primary care/internist.  I'm sure your plastic surgeon would appreciate “medical clearance”.

Assuming you are in good health  and that you are working with well experienced board-certified  plastic surgeon and anesthesiologist  in a fully accredited surgery center/hospital  you should do well.

The tummy tuck portion of the operation  is a portion that requires the most “recovery”. I would suggest that you have a lot of help for the first 2 weeks at least. Return to more strenuous activity may require 4 to 6 weeks.

A few additional words of advice may be helpful:


1. Make sure you are doing the procedure for the right reasons (for yourself)  and that you have realistic expectations.  Be aware that an improvement in the “problem area” may not translate to an overall improvement in your life   situation.  You are bound to be disappointed with results of the procedure if your motivation for doing the surgery is not internally driven.

2. Time your surgery carefully; generally, it is not a good idea to have surgery done during or immediately after a stressful period in life (for example divorce or death of a loved one). The additional stress of surgery will undoubtedly be  more challenging to deal with if a patient's emotional reserves our already exhausted. Remember, that an improvement in your physical appearance will not translate to an improvement in your life situation.

3. If possible speak to patients who have undergone similar procedures and query them about the toughest times of their recovery period. Any practical hints previous patients can provide may be very helpful.

4. Make sure you are aware of potential complications that may arise how to reach your surgeon if necessary.

5. Make sure you have a strong and patient support system (several people if possible) in place who have time/patience to take care of you. Arrange for professional nursing if any doubt exists regarding the availability and/or stamina  of your caretakers.

6. Be patient with the healing process, understanding that it will take several weeks to months to feel “normal” again. It may also take many months/year to see the end results of your surgery.

7. Be prepared to distract your mind with things of interest such as books, magazines, and movies.

8. Expect less of yourself; do not go back to work, school or chores too early and let others take care of you (for a change).

9. Pick your surgeon carefully (a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon) and trust in his/her advice. Keep in close communication with your surgeon and do not hesitate to communicate questions/concerns and the   emotional swings that you may experience.

10. Resume all medications that you were using preoperatively when cleared by your plastic surgeon and stop the use of narcotics and sedatives as soon as feasible after surgery.

11. Keep in mind the end results as you go through the tougher emotional times after your surgery.

I hope this helps.

 

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 682 reviews

Skin Removal After Weight Loss at Age 56

+1

Well congratulations on your accomplishment.  Your age is less inportant than your health status.  Hopefully the weight loss helped improved your health, but any residual issues should be carefully addressed.

Since your surgery is in two weeks, I am sure your surgeon has peformed the necessary tests and lab studies you may need.  Best wishes, Dr. L.

 

John LoMonaco, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 160 reviews

Age and body lift

+1

Your age alone is not a predictor of how well you will do with body lift surgery.  Your surgeon needs to assess your overall health status, smoking history etc.   You are 56 years young!  If you are healthy and in good shape, I'm sure you will do very well.  Please visit with a board certified plastic surgeon to learn more about your options.  Best of luck.

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 114 reviews

Lower body lift, age is just one factor

+1

As they say, age is just a number, and 56 is not too old at all for your procedure. The key is a good evaluation before with medical clearance for the procedure you have selected. Provided you are in optimal shape, coordination with your family physician can help make your procedure a safe one.

Best of luck, peterejohnsonmd.com

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

56 Not Necessarily Too Old For Lower Body Lift

+1

The fact that you are 56 years old does not mean that you too old for your surgery.  I am assuming that you are in reasonably good health since you are scheduled to have the procedure performed in 2 weeks.  Good health, nonsmoking status, normal blood pressure, etc. are much more important than age when determining risks for surgery.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.