I Am a 43 Yr. Old Mother of 2 with a Loss of Breast Volume from Breast Feeding and Age.

am considering breast implants. I am athletic, have a small frame, and merely want to fill out my 34B bras. I have researched both saline and silicone, and feel silicone will give me the natural look i want. What is the smallest cc implant I can go and which brand is better, Mentor or Allergan. And, what does my surgeon mean by inserting the implant "dual plane?"

Doctor Answers (3)

Breast implant sizing/type

+1

Both companies  manufacture great products with very similar characteristics and leakage rates.

In regards to size, it is very important to communicate your goals with your surgeon.  In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. I have found that the use of words such as “natural” or “C cup” or "fake looking" means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.

Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup  size may also be inaccurate.
I use  intraoperative sizers and place the patient in the upright position to evaluate breast size. Use of these sizers also allow me to select the press implant profile (low, moderate, moderate plus, high-profile) that would most likely achieve the patient's goals. The patient's goal pictures are hanging on the wall, and allow for direct comparison.
I have found that this system is very helpful in improving the chances of achieving the patient's goals as consistently as possible.
By the way, the most common regret after this operation, is “I wish I was bigger”.
I hope this helps.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 720 reviews

Breast implant for loss of volume with breastfeeding

+1

Silicone gel implants do give you a more natural result, particularly in a slender patient.  Both Allergan and Mentor implants are excellent, the one used is usually according to the surgeon's preference but we would use whichever one a patient requested.  The smallest implant is 100cc, but this is so small and narrow in diameter that one might wonder what the point is of accepting the risks of surgery for such a very small change.  I have put in implants as small as 150cc, but more commonly would go about 175-200cc in a patient who wanted very little augmentation.  225-250cc is still a very conservative augmentation, and the best thing to do is to try on implant sizers in a stretch bra and get some idea what those volumes added to what you have looks like in terms of total volume.  Dual plane refers to going under the muscle, and then releasing the breast tissue from the muscle as well so that the muscle does not restrict the ability of the implant to fill out the lower pole, and different degrees of release are used in different clinical situations.  The top of the implant is under the muscle, the bottom of the implant is under the breast tissue (since the pectoralis does not extend all the way down the breast to the fold under the breast).

Robert M. Grenley, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

Breast augmentation after pregnancy

+1

The amount of cc's depends on the current volume of breast tissue you have and the size you want to achieve. I routinely use 3D imaging on my patients which illustrates how many cc's a patient will need to get to a certain look. I would imagine you may need 300cc's or so, but this is difficult to say without seeing a photo of you.

Mentor and Allergan manufacture very similar products, so you can't go wrong with either one.

Dual plane refers to a portion of the implant (upper) being behind the pectoral muscle and the lower portion of the implant being right up against the breast tissue.

Best wishes,

Dr.Bruno

William Bruno, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 144 reviews

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