Is 36B Too Small for Breast Reduction Surgery?

My breasts are by no means too large nor are they causing me physical pain but I desperately want perkier breasts. I am 21 years old with rather saggy and asymmetrical 36B breasts with very large areola. I am 5'6' and 145 lbs; I've lost about 90lbs in the past two years, though my breasts have always sagged. I started developing breasts at around nine years old. I would like to reduce my cup size to an "A" as well as have a lift followed by an areola reduction.

Doctor Answers (12)

Breast Reduction - for a 36B

+1

Yes...and no.  Depending on the definition.

A breast reduction is typically defined by the removal of about 500 grams from each side (about half a pound) although it may be more or less, depending on your BMI and other physical issues.  With that definition, removing enough tissue to have it be considered a breast reduction would, in my opinion, be too much of a reduction for you.

On the other hand, what you'd benefit from is a breast lift - which is essentially the same procedure as a breast reduction but with much less tissue removed.  That's what would look best on you; and possibly with a small breast implant to provide superior fullness.  If you truly want to be an A then a lift alone is probably okay (you can also insert an implant later if you want).  And an areola reduction would be beneficial, too.

I doubt that you would get insurance approval for this procedure, in case that was part of the question. 

I hope that this helps and good luck,

Dr. E


New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 155 reviews

Breast uplift or reduction

+1

I would be very careful of having too much tissue removed for the size becomes smaller for about a year after a breast reduction. You appear to be a better candidate for a full uplift, mastopexy which would reduce the size of your areola as well as reshape your breasts. The negative are the scars which I try to minimize.

Edward J. Domanskis, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

36B... too small for a breast reduction?

+1

Happiness with your breast size is a very personal decision. If you feel that you would look good with an A-cup and desire an A-cup, that can certainly be done safely based on your photos with a breast lift including small breast and areola reduction.

Robert Heck, MD
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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Redution and lift for B to A cup.

+1

What you are describing is more of a breast lift.  The areola will be reduced in size with this procedure.  One can make an argument for taking a small amount of tissue.  Best to see a few Board Certified Plastic Surgeons.  Take photos of what you want to achieve.  Ask to see his before and after photos.   Together you will come up with a good plan.

Jeffrey Roth, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Reducing B Cup breasts

+1

A breast lift with small reduction and reduction of the areola would enhance your appearance.  Just lifting the breasts and removing excess skin will make them look smaller and perkier, so none or very little breast tissue removal will accomplish your goals.  The symmetry can also be improved.  Congratualtions on your weight loss!

Marialyn Sardo, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Breast reduction

+1

I think that you are the candidate for a breast lift (mastopexy) along with a small reduction and areola reduction. I would suggest that you communicate your goals carefully (I like to use pictures for this communication) with your surgeon. The use of pictures is helpful since different words (for example “natural”) means different things to different people. Talking cup size is also somewhat arbitrary since cup sizes differ depending who makes the bra.

You should also  consider how much fullness/volume you wish to have along the superior poles of the breasts. Although it may sound counterintuitive, you may elect to have small breast implants used to achieve the fullness superiorly.

It is important to consult with well-trained/experience board-certified plastic surgeons to get the best advice possible. Good luck!

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 793 reviews

36B too small for breast reduction?

+1

You are correct in requesting a breast lift and reduction in areolar size, but reducing the size of your breasts is not recommended.  At B cup size, they appear to be proportionate with your body, just spread out over a large area.  The mastopexy alone will result in more compact, comfortable, well positioned, attractive breasts. 

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Breast lift with a small and asymmetric reduction should help you reach your goal

+1

What you are describing is more of a breast lift to rejuvenate and lift your breasts and a very small removal of breast tissue. This can definitely be performed to help you obtain a more perky, youthful look with greater symmetry and a smaller size.

You should make sure that an "A" is truly what you want. Many women have misconceptions about cup sizes, often thinking a given cup is larger than it is in reality.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Reduction and lift for the smaller breast

+1

The answer of course is yes, you can have a reduction and lift and probably make your goal of a full A-cup. You can be confident without a bra or perhaps use a cami top. The trade-off is a scar however, and the potential for interference with breast feeding, but if your mind is made up your goal is reasonable and within reach.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Lollipop scar vertical breast reduction should give you very good result.

+1

Hi.

1)  The technique is very important.  You need either Lejour or Hall-Findlay method of breast lift, reduction of areolas, and slight breast reduction.

2)  These methods reshape and lift the breasts INTERNALLY, and this produces good long term shape.

3)  Other methods rely on tightening the skin to lift the breasts, but skin stretches and so you don't get a good result down the line.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.