Will 350 Cc's Give Me a Full B/small C Look or a Full C?

I am 5'8" 120 lbs with a 32A cup prior to augmentation. I am getting Silicone Implants but going back and forth between 325 and 350 cc's. Will both of these sizes no matter what give me a C cup? I want the look of (and I understand cup sizes don't matter to surgeons, but it's how I can best describe my desired size) but I'm hoping for what would be in between a full B and a small C. I'm so afraid of going too big (even though I know a lot of patients regret not going big enough post augmentation)

Doctor Answers (12)

Will 350cc's give me a full B/small C look or a full C?

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Hello! Thank you for your question. In general, implant size does not correlate with bra cup size. The cup size itself will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer as well as who is doing the actual measurements. Thus, cup size is never a reliable indicator for your breast size. I typically encourage my patients not to communicate her desires in cup size but more on the actual look and appearance. Given your desires, a breast augmentation, with an implant or fat grafting, would be an ideal procedure that would meet your expectations. Breast augmentation is now the most popular procedure performed in plastic surgery today. One tolerated very well by women with minimal downtime and high patient satisfaction.

Good communication between you and your surgeon of your expectations is warranted - choosing your surgeon wisely is the first step. Discussion of your wishes and having an honest and open dialog of your procedure is mandatory (e.g, implant type, incision, placement, etc). Your height, weight, breast width, and body habitus will make a difference for which implant style/projection to choose. Implant profile will also make a difference on the projection, which will influence overall breast/cup size. I have found that photographs brought by the patient is helpful to get a visualization of the appearance you wish for in terms of size, shape, fullness, etc. In addition, your surgeon's pre and postoperative photographs should demonstrate a realistic goal for you of results. Sizers are helpful during an in-office consultation. Once this has been accomplished, allow your surgeon to utilize his/her best medical judgment during the procedure to finesse the best possible result for you after preoperative biodimensional planning and fitting the right implant for your breast width. This is the most important determinant for the sizing of implants, which will provide the optimal result and most aesthetically-pleasing result for you.

Consult with a board-certified plastic surgeon well-versed in breast procedures who will examine and discuss with you the various options and factors to consider and help you decide which one will be the right one for you. Hope me that this helps! Best wishes for a wonderful result!


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Implant size

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Given your size and your expectations, I think either 325 or 350 would be an appropriate size implant in your case.  Large enough to make a worthwhile difference, but not too large.  I think you could expect a small to mid C cup. However, cup size is somewhat subjective. Good luck!

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

A cup to C cup

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Hi, the difference between 325 and 350 is barely visible even for an A cup start point. It is impossible to predict exactly how big you will look since a lot of factors are involved including muscle and skin laxity. But on average a 350 implant should increase the cup size by about 2 sizes or less, so starting from an A cup, its a bit unlikely to achieve full C cup with that implant. Please check again with your surgeon and try to look at many pictures of patients of similar frame and preop cup size even though not very accurate but it is helpfull.

Antoine A. Hallak, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

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Small C or full C

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Dear hopeful,

    It is all in the measurement and cup size does matter. That is the best way for a patient to communicate with a surgeon. It might not be 100%  exact but it is quite close as long as the surgeon understand the ratio between breast size and chest measurement. So, assuming that your measurment is correct, 325cc implant will give you a full C and a 350cc implant will give you a small D. If you want to be a full B or small C you will need 190cc implant or 220cc implant. You might want to consider a saline implants that will give the surgeon more flexibility to adjust to the desired size.

                         Best of luck,

                                                       Dr Widder

                                                            

Shlomo Widder, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Implant and cup size

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It is very difficult to predict cup size from a specific implant chosen. The best way for you to figure out what you want is to do a "baggy test."  Of course, a proper exam and consultation will guide you in the right direction.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Choosing a breast implant size to achieve a full B/small C.

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While you may think that you have given enough information for a plastic surgeon to comment about your implant choices, it is not enough to give your height, weight, and current cup size.  There are many factors that are involved in choosing an implant size- droop of the A cup, excess skin, length from your clavicle to your areola, width of your pectoral pocket, depth of your chest cavity.  This list goes on and on.  It is absolutely best to discuss your surgical goals with your plastic surgeon and then find the confidence in him or her to deliver those goals.  As far as going back and forth between a 325 cc and 350 cc gel, there isn't a whole lot of difference.

Eric A. Marchant, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Try sizer implants before your surgery...

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I help my patients select the correct size with two methods:


1. Dimensional planning and

2. A Gel Implant Sizing system


Dimensional planning – The measurements of your chest wall are taken. Also, the breast dimensions including the height, width, and current dimensions of each breast form the basis of dimensional planning. Based on these measurements, the implant size is recommended. This will give you a unique breast implant that is suited for your body frame. Even your fitness levels and other relevant criteria are taken into consideration. It is you who will decide what you are comfortable with.


Gel Implant Sizing system – During the preliminary breast implant consultation, you will be provided with an option to “try on” a variety of implant shapes and sizes. You can also visualize the possible outcomes of your surgery which helps you to get that perfect size to give you the shape that you longed for.


This way your preferences are known and you can then pick a range of implants that will “fit” just right to give a soft natural fuller look.

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 124 reviews

Breast Implant size and Bra Cup Sizes

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Hello,

It is not that plastic surgeons don't care about cup sizes, it's just that we can't predict what size you'll be, even knowing your current size, and what implant size has been chosen.  Bringing in photosgraphs usually depicts quite well the appearance you are trying to obtain, and will allow the surgeon to estimate the size of implant needed to obtain that look..  As for 325 versus 350, you are agonizing over a very little difference in size.

Your concern about going too big is well founded, and when it comes to regret, it seems that its those that didn't go big enough that are getting all the press.  In reality, the ones that go too big are as numerous or more than the others, and certainly more regretful, especially after their second or third reoperation to correct the problems associated with their poor decision.  We surgeons that answer questions on RealSelf.com see post after post of those that have had problems associated with going too big.

You should see a few well qualified (certified by the ABPS) and experienced (member of the ASAPS) and allow them to measure your anatomy to decide what is the most appropriately sized implant. Knowing that will allow them to discuss risks of using larger implants in your quest for your aesthetic goal.

Best of luck!

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Breast implant size recommendation going from A To small C cup

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Both of the sizes you mentioned will probably give you the desired size.  The difference between the 2 will be barely perceptible.  If you have already narrowed it down to these implants, then I would have your surgeon err on the side of going a little smaller and use the smaller implants.  As mentioned, generally we, as surgeons, try not to get too hung up on an exact size preoperatively, rather a range.  You are right, if patients are ever unhappy with size usually they wish they went a little larger.  Nonetheless, I certainly have lots of patients who tell me to keep on the smaller side of what they are requesting (runners, avid exercisers).  Best of luck to you.

James E. Chappell, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Will 350 Cc's Give Me a Full B/small C Look or a Full C?

+1

Patients get really caught up in cc's and it is sometimes difficult to make them understand what that means. The 25cc difference you are worried about is so small I doubt you could even tell. It is not even 2 tablespoons in volume. Tell your doctor what you want, show him photos, and then let him worry about the implant. If he is making you choose the implant when you have no experience with that and he does, perhaps you should get another consultation elsewhere.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.