I was a 34B and wanted a D cup. My surgeon put in 450cc silicone Mentor implants. Will the result meet my expectation? (photo)

I'm 5'6 and weight 154lbs. It was done under the muscle. I'm at my 10 day post op and have seen significant changes and they look great, but I'm concern they will become too small and not fulfill the cup D expectation.

Doctor Answers (8)

Expectations post aug

+1
I think every woman has certain expectations following a breast augmenattion and if your expectations are huge you may sometimes be disappointed.450 cc implants are bigger than most and I would expect they will met your expectations but as with any surgeon youe pocket can only accomodate a certain size.As I always tell my patients you can not put a gallon of milk into a quart contained.


Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breast size after breast augmentation

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It can be difficult to always be on the same page with patients with women when talking about bra size.  The bras in some departments stores will be quite large, Victoria Secret somewhat large and parisian boutiques much smaller. They are all very different, but depending on the expectation there can be a problem. Im my office I ask that a women bring is a bra she'd like to fill out. Looking at many many photos of women with your starting points can also be very helpful. Attached is my gallery I hope you find it helpful. 

Michael Law, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

BBA

+1

It's too early.  Wait to determine your final size - will take a few months.  Based on your picture, I'd be surprised if your goal size wasn't met.

Best,

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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Results

+1

Too early to tell.  You are only 10 days after surgery.  Be patient.  It takes 3-6 weeks to see your final results.  I'm sure you will love your results!
Best wishes.

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

10 days post-op breast augmentation--will size go down "too much" as you heal?

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Thanks for including photos--you look great and appear to have little bruising, one sign of careful surgery (and good patient compliance with activity restrictions)! 450cc submuscular silicone gel implants seem to be a good choice for someone with your frame and pre-op breast anatomy, and your results thus far show what will certainly be D-cup breasts for some bra manufacturers.

But, if you were to try on brassieres from other manufacturers and find that a C-cup bra fit better and looked nicer on you, would you be distressed? I certainly hope not, as you must understand that it's all about the "look," not the letter on the bra label!

My sizing guideline (determined over 27 years and thousands of patients) is that it takes about 250cc to equal one bra cup size. This would put you nearly two cup sizes larger than what you started with. Since you didn't include pre-op photos, it's impossible to see if you were a "barely B-cup" or a "nearly C-cup" 34B, just as different bra manufacturers will fit your anatomy differently now, and in a few months when healing is further down the road.

The actual answer to your question can be determined only by you, since expectations are a product of both your personal goals, and your surgeon's pre-operative teaching. Perhaps a better question would be:
"How much will my breasts change in appearance as swelling goes down, skin and breast tissues stretch, and implant position drops over time?"

The answer to that question is related to individual anatomic factors such as pre-operative muscle tone, skin elasticity, and healing/scar formation over the 6-12 months it takes to reach "final" appearance (as well as whether or not you gain or lose weight during that time). It also depends heavily on the quality of your surgery--if your surgeon used precise and careful technique, meticulous hemostasis (control of bleeding capillaries), performed antibiotic or Betadine irrigation of the submuscular pockets, avoided bacterial and other microscopic contamination of your implants (Keller Funnel no-touch technique?), etc., then you have the least tissue damage, the least swelling, and the fastest and easiest recovery. Not to mention the least likelihood of avoiding capsular contracture.

Though many surgeons utilize periareolar incisions and produce fabulous results (as it appears your surgeon has), this route of implant insertion does expose your implants to a somewhat higher potential for contamination of the implants with intraductal bacteria, since the implants are inserted through the breast tissue. Axillary incisions avoid the breast ducts (and their bacteria) but the armpit is full of bacteria-filled sweat glands, so that too has a somewhat higher chance of bacterial contamination that could lead to capsular contracture and changes in your appearance. Inframammary crease incisions avoid armpit and intraductal bacteria, and therefore are the best from a bacterial standpoint, but some surgeons and patients prefer the appearance of the other scars and are willing to accept those (minimally) increased risks. And to be factually fair, individual surgical differences (see the paragraph before this one) are significantly more important than the slight differences in well-performed surgery via any of the incisional choices. (Also, to be complete, I did not include umbilical incisions, since only saline implants can be inserted via that incision.)

So I'd say you have a splendid result thus far, appear to have had careful technique (as evidenced by your lack of bruising or significant swelling), and can therefore expect that size and volume of your breasts will change only by a minimal amount. Your implants will likely drop somewhat, and as your tissues and scars mature and stretch you will achieve a more teardrop (natural) and possibly more projecting appearance. Your breasts will also gradually feel more soft and natural.

Whatever supportive and/or attractive brassieres you choose will be entirely up to you, as will be how they fit your beautiful new breasts. (And the letter on the label should be the LEAST concern!) Cheers for the holiday season! Best wishes! Dr. Tholen

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

I was a 34B and wanted a D cup. My surgeon put in 450cc silicone Mentor implants. Will the result meet my expectation?

+1

Appears to be a D-cup but now to me it sounds like you wanted larger appearance. Thus a 550 cc would have been a better option.. The #! compliant is "I wish I would have gone bigger !".

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Expectations of cup size

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You are the only one who is going to be able to ultimately answer that question as you get used to your new implants. Keep in mind that all bra manufacturers vary as far as cup size. I tell my patients that a basic rule of thumb is 200 cc per cup size so 450 cc is likely to be adequate.   That being said Ithink you look great so far and likely your expectations will be met.

Terrence Murphy, MD
Englewood Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

I was a 34B and wanted a D cup. My surgeon put in 450cc silicone Mentor implants. Will the result meet my expectation?

+1

Congratulations on having undergone the breast augmentation surgery! Generally speaking, I ask my patients not to base their communication and/or expectations with the outcome of breast surgery on achieving a specific cup size. If I had to GUESS  in your case, the breast implant size used will be sufficient to achieve a "D cup". 

 Again, remember that cup sizes will vary from one bra manufacture to another and is certainly not the best way to communicate goals and/or assess outcomes.

 Best wishes; hopefully, you will be pleased with the outcome of the procedure performed, regardless of the specific cup size achieved.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 724 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.