I Am Currently a 34 B and my PS Wants to Put in 600 Silicone. is This Too Much?

i am currently a 34 b and i would like to be a d cup. my pa wants to put 600 cc silicone in. is that too much? please help

Doctor Answers (14)

Implant Selection Process

+1

In order to make an accurate size recommendation, I would need to assess your chest wall and breast mound measurements and characteristics.  Unfortunately, there is not a general rule of thumb or objective criteria to implant selection.
Your plastic surgeon will perform several measurements of your chest wall and breast anatomy and determine a range of implants that both fit your chest wall and reach your desired goals.
The next step is to try on this range of implants in the office with your doctor.   The key to this success is showing your surgeon the body proportion you desire with a bra sizer and allowing your surgeon to guide you to the right implant.   It will be much easier to communicate in implant cc's than cup size when determining the appropriate implant for you.
I wish you a safe recovery and fantastic result.
Dr. Gill


Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Breast augmentation surgery

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It is difficult to answer your question because I don't know what your "goals" are. Clear communication with your plastic surgeon is important in achieving the desired goals of the patient.  I like to communicate with patients with “goal” pictures.  During surgery, I use temporary sizers to determine the size/profile that will give the patient the look she is looking for. Trying to predict the size of the implant preoperatively is not ideal.  I think it is too much responsibility for the patient to choose the size of the implant.  Ideally, the surgeon would make that determination once he/she is in the operating room with sizers in and examining the patient in the upright and supine position.  There are many variables that come into play when choosing the correct implant size (how much breast tissue the patient currently has, the shape of the chest wall (concave vs. convex), etc.. There are limitations as to how large you can go in 1 surgery with breast augmentation - make sure your surgeon is a board certified surgeon and has experience.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 759 reviews

Breast implants should be matched to your chest and breast size

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For optimal results after breast augmentation, it is important that the breast implant placed be matched to your chest and breast size.  The relation of the width of the implant to the width and height of your breast is much more important than the actual volume that is chosen (although they are related). Do not be too focused on a specific volume; make sure that the breast implant "fits" you.

Kevin Brenner, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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600 cc implants are BIG implants.

+1

A 600cc implant is likely to make you much larger than a D cup. That is a very large implant. My recommendation is to see a few other board certified plastic surgeons to see what they recommend. 

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

I Am Currently a 34 B and my PS Wants to Put in 600 Silicone. is This Too Much?

+1

All the posted responses can only assume you might need a larger implant. But no photo was posted so very hard to advise. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Big Girls

+1

600 cc implants are in general large implants.  I rarely recommend that volume of implant for a breast augmentation.  

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Implant choice

+1

What is the right size for you? 600 cc implants are quite large. I choose implants based upon the patient's anatomy and their goals of surgery.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

When are Breast Implants Too Large

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The size breast implant that your body will accomodate depends on the width of your breast base and the amount of available skin. Within these boundaries, your personal preferences are the most important factor. Having said that, 600cc silicone implants are very large for almost anybody although exceptions might exist. Although it involves a little guesswork without photos, if you fill out a B cup now, you should be able to reach a D cup without using such large implants. BE sure that you have a sizing session in which you put real implants inside a bra and look in a mirror first. It's not an exact simulation, but it will give you an idea of what you are getting yourself into. And get another opinion.

Joseph Fata, MD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

600 CC implants

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600 cc implants are very large, especially if you are currently a B cup.  However, without pictures or seeing you in person, it is impossible to give you specific advice.  Also, 600 cc for one person may be large, but just a drop in the bucket for a larger person.  So, it really has to do with more than the size of the implant - the size of the patient, measurements, tissue thickness and quality all affect proper implant choice.

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

How big is 600cc breast implant

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Certainly a 600cc breast implant is a very large and full implant. Is it too big? That can depend on the look you wish for after breast augmentation. Consider that the 'average' breast augmentation is about 350cc, and the very full implant questions referred to on this site are in the 400 to 550cc range, usually HP. The 600cc is 'out there' and if you do not live in an area where augmentations are very large, think La Vegas, do your homework before you jump in.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.