28 yrs old female- severally abnormal mole on bottom of foot. Went to plastic surgeon now what?

My mole came back severe abnormality so I went to plastic surgeon yesterday who tried to get clean margins stitched me up and sent me on my way ...confused. lm in a lot of pain given the stitches location and am confused what next? I know I see him in two weeks for stitches removal and lab reports but no one has really explained what is going on/how I got this since the bottom of my foot doesn't see a lot of sun. I'm worried and in a lot of pain after yesterdays surgery

Doctor Answers (2)

Abnormal mole on foot

+1
I'm sorry things weren't better explained to you. There are many things that could have caused this to be "abnormal". It would be best for you to ask your surgeon and go over the pathology so it can be discussed with you properly. Yes, you are right that your foot probably didn't get much sun, but when we are older and get moles on our feet, they tend to be abnormal in some variety. This doesn't necessarily mean you will get more, or that you need to be scared. BUT, the diagnosis, pathology, and next steps should be better discussed with you. Call your doctor if you'd like before you return for the sutures, or let them know you want time with the physician when you go in for that. Your foot will be sore and tender, and there's no getting around that.

"This answer has been solicited without seeing this patient and cannot be held as true medical advice, but only opinion. Seek in-person treatment with a trained medical professional for appropriate care."


Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Abnormal Mole

+1

It is very difficult to make a diagnosis on the internet. Without the pathology report and examination everything is a guess.

Before the surgery, you owed an explanation of the pathology report, the diagnosis, and the options of treatment.

It is your surgeon's obligation to answer all your questions and explain the pathology report, and no body else.

Abnormal mole could be many things, from atypical, architectural, cytological, dysplastic nevus, carcinoma in situ, or malignant melanoma. All these should be explained by your plastic surgeon, along with prognosis, and treatment and follow up schedule.

Samir Shureih MD. FACS

sshureih@msn.com

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.