23, 265lbs and 32k: What size would you recommend I go down to? (Photo)

Right now I working out trying to loose weight and was wondering will my breast go down if I continue to drop the weight? Also wanted to know would it be better to have the operation done after I complete my goal with loosing weight or while in the process? And if I was to get a procedure done what size would I go down to?

Doctor Answers (7)

Ultimate Breast Reduction(TM)

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I recommend a new technique called The Ultimate Breast ReductionTM. This technique reshapes your breast tissue creating upper pole fullness, elevates them higher on the chest wall and more medial to increase your cleavage. Pain is relieved by transferring the weight of the breast to the underlying muscle, which produces long lasting stable results. This technique avoids the ugly vertical scars of the traditional technique, maintains nipple sensation and the ability to breast feed.

Best Wishes,

Gary Horndeski, M.D. 


Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

23, 265lbs and 32k: What size would you recommend I go down to?

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YES! weight loss prior to any operation is a better course to action. Good Luck on your weight loss... 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

23, 265lbs and 32k: What size would you recommend I go down to?

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Thank you very much for your question and photo. It does certainly look as if you would benefit from a breast reduction as you are a K cup at present.
At Aurora Clinics surgeons generally aim to get your bust down, following breast reduction, to a size that is very much in proportion to your overall physique.
This depends on your general body make up but is generally a C to D cup.
This leaves you still full in the bust area but reduces tension from the weight of your bust on your neck, shoulders and back.
I think however it would be worth talking to a surgeon in your area about details of what they would expect and in particular asking them to show you before and after pictures of patients they have treated who have reductions similar to yours.
I do wish you the best of luck if you do decide to go ahead with breast reduction surgery.
With best wishes

Adrian Richards, MD
London Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

23, 265lbs and 32k: What size would you recommend I go down to?

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 Congratulations on your decision to proceed with breast reduction surgery; this operation tends to be one of the most patient pleasing operations we perform. You are wise in achieving as close to possible to a long-term stable weight prior to proceeding with surgery.

 I would suggest that you communicate your goals clearly with your plastic surgeon and make sure that you have realistic expectations prior to proceeding with any type of surgery. In regards to breast size desired, also communicate carefully. In my practice the use of goal pictures are helpful in this regard; a discussion of cup size can be confusing and imprecise.   Therefore, I would not suggest that you communicate your goals and/or base your satisfaction with the outcome of surgery on achieving a specific cup size.

 I also find that the use of pictures is more helpful than the words “natural” or "proportionate” or "C or D cup" etc., can mean different things to different people.
Many of my patients choose to have enough breast tissue removed to help alleviate symptoms while retaining enough breast tissue to remain proportionate to the remainder of  bare torso. Again, preoperative communication will be critical.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 710 reviews

Breast reduction and weight loss

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Weight loss will affect each woman differently, but it is very likely if you lost a significant amount of weight that your breasts would also become smaller.  I strongly recommend to my patients that if you're planning to lose weight, you should do so prior to any body contouring procedure, including a breast reduction.  Your surgeon will only be able to match the size of your breasts to the body you have on the day of surgery.  If your weight changes significantly after surgery, it isn't predictable how your breast size and proportions will change with that weight loss. 

With regard to the size you should request, I prefer to discuss proportions rather than bra sizes.  Most women have no idea what a C or D or DD will look like on their body (a 34D is a relatively big breast while a 44D is a relatively small breast).  When discussing sizing with my patients, I find it more accurate to discuss whether they'd like their breasts to be "average" for their height and weight (medium), larger than that (large), or smaller than that (small).  I then review breast reduction before and after photos with them so they can see what I think is small, medium, or large for each of the photos we review to help them guide me to the proportions they are hoping to achieve.  Whether your surgeon discusses sizing based on proportions or bra sizes, I think it's a good idea to clarify with them which of the photos they show you creates the look you're hoping for.

Best of luck with your weight loss!

Lisa J. Peters, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

23, 265lbs and 32k: What size would you recommend I go down to?

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It's great that you are losing weight and in general, to minimize serious risks,, we would want to see your BMI under 35 for a breast reduction. Weight loss will certainly make your breasts somewhat smaller but to get a good looking result you will want the reduction and lift once you are at a safe weight.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Weight loss with breast reduction

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Of course weight loss will only make things better, but you can complete your reduction first. Given the base width of your breast a D cup may be the best goal, and even a DD will be a very substantial improvement.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.