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Lifting a 2 Year Old After Tummy Tuck

I Have a 2 Year Old Girl, Planning on Doing Tummy Tuck and Butt Lift Any Suggestion? My question is how long do I have to wait to be able to lift her again, I am taking 4 weeks off from work is that enough time?

Doctor Answers (6)

Lifting after a Tummy Tuck

+2

At 3 weeks post-op after any type of surgery, the incision strength is only at 50% of normal strength. At 6 weeks, is it at 100% in most cases. I tell my patients to wait at least 6 weeks before lifting anything over 20 pounds.

During the 6 week healing process, the body is healing internally and can still be damaged with any extraneous activity. She may be able to sit in your lap during this time but I would ask your doctor to be sure.

As far as time off of work, 4 weeks is plenty of time. Now if your job requires that you lift, push or pull anything heavy, you may want to take 6 weeks off.


Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Tummy tuck recover and lifting

+2

You should expect to avoid lifting of your child for approximately four weeks to allow your muscles to heal following muscle plication.

Arian Mowlavi, MD
Laguna Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Lifting a 2 Year Old After Tummy Tuck

+2

During that second period we advise limited activity and straining (that includes lifting your 2 mos old).Other than good control of bleeding during surgery, we like to keep patients calm, pain controlled, and gently compressed (like a nose bleed) in the first 24 hours.And then a small time frame between 7-10 days after surgery when the clots breakdown (fibrinolysis) and blood vessels can potentially open up and bleed. This is the initial 24 hour period when helpful clots form on the vessels that are transected during surgery and vasospasm (clamping down of the vessels) relax and open up. Patients also have two periods of potential bleeding that occurs after any surgery.  If you do have to lift avoid bending over and straining. Have your partner hand your child to you. Bend your knees and lift more with your legs than your back and stomach muscles. Have a partner do the lifitng for you. Generally most tummy tucks involve muscle repairs (similar to a hernia) that require a minimum of 6 weeks to gain sufficient scar tissue to reinforce the repair. Most general surgeons advise patients to wait at least 3-4 weeks before resuming activities. I suggest similar guidelines to my patients. However, it really depends on your tummy tuck ; if you don't have a muscle repair, this restriction is not as important.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Lifting following a tummy tuck

+2

I advise my patients that I takes, on average, 10 days to get back to work in a job that does not require lifting.  In general, it is best not to lift more than 15 lbs for about 6 weeks after surgery.  Every surgeon is different, though, and yours will be able to give you the best advice.  Good luck!

Jason R. Hess, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
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Lifitng a child after a tummy tuck

+2

In general, I have patients wait at least three to four weeks after surgery to perform any aerobic activity.  I then have them wait six to eight weeks to perform any hevy lifitng.  I think that early activity may cause a hematoma whcih would not be good.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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How long to lift

+2

It is very important following a Tummy Tuck not to have any significant shearing of the layers between the skin and underlying muscle for several weeks. Shearing can cause fluid to build up. Also, if you are having the muscle wall tightened, you would not want to do any lifting for a minimum of 6 weeks.

Marc Schneider, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.